Redcar - St Augustine

This is one of a number of churches built in the 1930s to serve Catholics in the expanding urban areas along the North Yorkshire coast. Although it cannot be described as particularly distinguished architecturally, it is, like so many churches of its time, built of brick in a quiet, round-arched style and has much careful detailing. 

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Richmond - St Joseph and St Francix Xavier

A handsome, large mid-19th century Gothic church by a Yorkshire architect with an established London practice.  Despite some reordering, the character of the interior is well-preserved.

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Sacred Heart - Northallerton

A modest interwar building of conservative design and limited architectural interest, built by Spink of Bridlington in collaboration with Bishop Shine.

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Saltburn - Our Lady of Lourdes

Built in 1928, this church was designed with some care and is an attractive, if fairly modest, Lombard Romanesque-style essay in brick. The use of a semi-circular apse, narrow brickwork and use of tile for decorative effect give it a pleasing appearance, typical of restrained but elegant work between the wars.

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Scarborough - St Edward the Confessor

A pleasing church in the Byzantine style, somewhat quirky and curious in this comfortable Victorian suburb, and forming an attractive townscape feature.

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Scarborough - St George

Although Francis Johnson was a noted Yorkshire architect, his design for St Joseph’s is modest and unassuming, a simple building on a small budget. The later additions have been carefully designed and, whilst not unattractive, the church is not of particular architectural significance.

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Scarborough - St Joseph

A well-crafted and complete design by Francis Johnson, with fittings by Wilfred Dowson. Johnson is known mainly for his country house work, generally in a Classical idiom, but the style of St Joseph’s however owes more to early 20th century Scandinavian and Italian precedents. 

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Scarborough - St Peter

An excellent mid-Victorian town church by George Goldie, a York-born architect who worked widely in the diocese. St Peter’s was identified by Eastlake as the first Gothic Revival church to have a windowless sanctuary. Well crafted and full of good detail (particularly in the sanctuary).

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South Bank - St Peter

The present church of 1903-5 replaced a smaller one of 1874 which is still standing. Apart from the small cupola straddling the roof ridge towards the east end of the nave and the detail of the glazing, most of the external features would suggest a building of rather earlier date. However, inside the uninterrupted vista up the nave into the chancel, the striking ceiled hammerbeam roof, wooden vaulting in the aisles, and polished brown granite piers add up to an interior of great distinction. The west façade fronting the road forms a significant local landmark in a very drab urban area.

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Staithes - Our Lady Star of the Sea

A modest Victorian church not without character, though this is really confined to the quirky design of the west front and bell turret. 

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Stokesley - St Joseph

The church is a work by the noted Catholic architect, George Goldie. At Stokesley the budget was very tight and the building was cheaply built in brick with little architectural embellishment beyond some basic polychromy and a tall bellcote. The building was much altered after a fire in the 1970s. 

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Tang Hall - St Aelred

Post-war church of portal frame construction, serving an interwar housing  estate.  The  glazing  and  reredos  are  distinctive  and  serve  to unify the design, and the statuary is of some interest.

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Teesville - St Andrew

This is a fairly modest piece of architecture though it has a little more embellishment than the rather later St Anne’s (by the same architectural practice). Its construction and details are typical of routine modernist architecture in the 1960s and, although it has an effective, light worship space, this is functional rather than having any special architectural qualities.

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Teesville - St Anne

The church is a utilitarian design, typical of churches of the time in presenting a single worship space with minimal embellishment. 

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Thirsk - All Saints

A modest town-centre Catholic church of the mid-19th century, probably by a local architect, which has retrained much of its original character and which contributes positively to the local conservation area..

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Thornaby - Christ the King

The church, one of many by F.B. Swainston for the diocese, is part of a parish complex which brings liturgical and non-liturgical functions as well as the priest’s accommodation into a unified whole. The result is functional but does not result in any particularly striking architecture. The most notable fixture is the large stained glass window.

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Thornaby - St Patrick

The church acts as something of a landmark in a rather drab residential area. Architecturally it is fairly conservative for its date. Externally the transverse gables add some individuality to the north elevation. The interior retains its original coherence; the simplified detail of the piers is unusual and the reredos has some distinction. 

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Thorntree - Corpus Christi

The church of Christ the King was built at the end of the 1950s and hence before changes in design that followed on from Vatican II. It is a long, broad structure without aisles but with a lower sanctuary. Its lines and the detailing are simple. Architecturally it is of limited interest although the internal arrangement where an aisle arcade is expected and yet is not there (rather there is a huge lintel running from one end of the church to the other) is a feature of some curiosity.

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Ugthorpe - St Anne

A good and substantial rural church, with high quality furnishings, especially the stained glass. The architect George Goldie was born in York and is a 19th century Catholic church architect of national standing. He built widely in the diocese.

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Ulshaw Bridge - St Simon and St Jude

A very picturesque small mid-19th century chapel built in neo-Romanesque style for the Scrope family of Danby Hall, many of whom are buried in the vault beneath the building. The present building may incorporate elements of an earlier chapel on the site. Joseph Hansom, the architect, also worked for the Scropes at Danby Hall. The octagonal tower is a local landmark, and the church has good group value with the adjoining (earlier) former presbytery.

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