Corby - St Brendan

A large 1960s church built on a traditional longitudinal plan. It is not without some interest architecturally, but is not remarkable for its time and is not of particular townscape importance.

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Corby - St Patrick

A 1960s church of individual design and strong character by a noted local architectural firm.

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Datchet - St Augustine

A  characterful  rural  church  with  an unusual  stage-scenery  Classical façade and a homely interior with some good marble furnishings. The external appearance of the building has been marred by UPVC window replacement.

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Desborough - Holy Trinity

A   good   late-Victorian   former   Nonconformist   church   of   distinctive design, prominent in the townscape. The interior is of less importance, although its spatial characteristics are impressive.

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Earls Barton - St Anselm

The  church  is  a  utilitarian  design  of  the  late  1960s,  and  is  of  little architectural or historical significance.

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Eton - Our Lady of Sorrows

An interesting and lavish curiosity as an early 20th  century ‘copy’ of a Baroque church on a small scale, richly done by a talented amateur and benefactor as an expression of his religious fervour.

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Eton Wick - St Gilbert

A modest church of the 1960s, conventionally longitudinal in plan, and displaying architectural and decorative detail typical of its time.

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Gerrards Cross - St Joseph

A  curious  hybrid  building  of  two  dates;  of  the  uncompleted  earlier church of 1914 survives one external wall and a richly-decorated small chantry chapel typical of the Edwardian era.  The main church of 1962 is concrete-framed and more utilitarian, though still vestigially Gothic in its details.

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Great Billing - Our Lady of Perpetual Sorror -

An endearing church, especially the Classical interior. Architecturally the exterior is unremarkable, although the tower is attractive, largely for its Mediterranean character. The church is the Diocesan shrine of Our Lady of Perpetual Succour.

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Great Missenden - Immaculate Heart of Mary

From 1938 Great Missenden was part of the new parish of Princes Risborough. There was no church, and Mass was said over a butcher’s shop, in private houses, and in the village hall.

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High Wycombe - St Augustine, Apostle of England

An example of the late 20th  century Gothic style, infused with Classical elements, which was favoured by the architect J. Sebastian Comper and his more famous father Sir Ninian Comper.  The interior with its broad nave arcades is spacious and the arched stone choir gallery at the west end is striking, but the original character has been altered by the conversion of the clerestorey space above the nave into a parish room, cutting  out  much  of the  natural light,  and  also by  some  re-ordering which has removed features such as the ciborium over the former high altar.

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Houghton Regis - St Vincent de Paul

Church built in the late 1970s, attached to a school. Not of architectural distinction or historical significance.

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Kempston - Our Lady of Ransom

A  small  and  plain  church,  converted  from  a  neo-Georgian  telephone exchange.

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Kettering - St Edward

St Edward’s church is in that strand of longitudinally-planned inter- war brick churches of bold forms and massing and simplified detailing. It is a church of some character and merit, with a relatively unaltered interior. Its short blocky tower and adjoining tall gabled presbytery form a striking group on the edge of the Kettering Town Centre Conservation Area.

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Leighton Buzzard - The Sacred Heart

A plain brick church of the 1950s, substantially rebuilt in the 1970s.

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Little Chalfont - St Aidan

A functional design of the 1960s, lent some distinction by the somewhat New England-style western portico and shingled spirelet.

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Long Crendon - Our Lady of Light

A remarkable example of a building erected at low cost and largely by the energy and initiative of the parish priest and volunteers. The building has a 12-sided design and is built from the recycled moulds of a reinforced concrete portal frame. The most dramatic feature of the interior  is  the  dalle  de  verre  stained  glass  scheme  by  Goddard  and Gibbs.

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Luton - Holy Ghost

A large church of the mid-1960s by Desmond Williams & Associates. The design is functional, with the internal character of a secular hall. The church lacks the special interest of the contemporary church at Dunstable, by the same architects.

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Luton - Our Lady Help of Christians

An early 20th  century Gothic Revival church designed by its resident priest, with a lofty interior and some fine sanctuary furnishings. The aisles are later contextual additions.

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Stopsley - Sacred Heart of Jesus

A modest post-war structure built as a dual purpose church and hall, later adapted  and extended.  The interior,  with its  parabolic coffered ceiling, has a certain period charm.

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