Luton - St John the Apostle

A utilitarian structure built for agricultural purposes and converted to a church in the 1960s.

Read More

Luton - St Joseph

A large church in the Italian Romanesque/Basilican style that was so popular for Catholic churches in the interwar and post-war years. Completed in 1960, this is a late example.

Read More

Luton - St Martin de Porres

This is a church of limited architectural or historical significance, but it is well attended and cared for by its local congregation.

Read More

Marlow - St Peter

A small church by the leading Catholic architect A.W.N. Pugin, designed for the convert Charles Scott Murray and built in 1846. The church epitomises Pugin’s pursuit of the essence of the medieval English county parish   church   and   its   fittings   were   made   by   Pugin’s   favourite craftsmen.   Francis Pollen’s addition of 1970 is of interest in its own right as a tactful but unmistakably modern addition to a historic building.

Read More

Milton Keynes - Our Lady of Lourdes

Built in the mid-1970s under the direction of Derek Walker, Chief Architect to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation, the design of Our Lady of Lourdes is an interesting reinterpretation for ecclesiastical purposes of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye. It contains a notable collection of ceramic furnishings by Norman and Anna Adams.

Read More

Newport Pagnell - St Bede

The primary significance of the building lies in its architectural, historical and townscape interest as a mid-19th century civic building on a prominent town centre island site. The upper floor (now the church) is a fine compartmented space carried on cast iron columns. Conversion to church use has not involved major structural change, and has allowed for the introduction of some furnishings of interest by Peter Koenig.

Read More

Northampton - Cathedral of Our Lady Immaculate and St Thomas of Canterbury

The Cathedral church of the Diocese. Originating as a small chapel and residence in 1825 (both of which survive), a further church was built in the 1840s from the designs of A.W.N. Pugin. Following the Restoration of the Hierarchy and the creation of the Diocese of Northampton, E.W. Pugin prepared ambitious designs for a new Cathedral in 1860, only partly  implemented. A.W.N.  Pugin’s  church  survived until  the  1950s, when it was demolished to make way for a new tower, transepts and chancel, built from designs by A. Herbert. E.W. Pugin’s church is stone built  and  was  richly  furnished,  and  much  of  the  detail  remains. Herbert’s work is solid and dignified, giving the building something of the Cathedral scale and gravitas which it had hitherto lacked. The interior has undergone a number of transformations, most recently in 1998, and there are notable furnishings and fittings from each phase of its development. The Cathedral dominates an important complex of historic  buildings,  which  forms  the  nucleus   of  the  Barrack  Road Conservation Area.

Read More

Northampton - St Aidan

A mainly Gothic church of the 1960s and a late work by J. S. Comper. Although very old-fashioned for its date and externally somewhat uninspiring, it is well detailed and has a pleasant internal character. Comper built widely in the Diocese and this church, like several others he designed, was built to allow for later enlargement. The domed Lady Chapel is stylistically somewhat at odds with the rest of the building, and is evidence of Comper’s embracing of his father’s doctrine of ‘unity by inclusion’. The church lies within the old village settlement of Kingsthorpe, and the presbytery is a listed former farmhouse.

Read More

Northampton - St Gregory

A large post-war parish church in the Roman Basilican style by Sebastian Comper. Building economies of the time and the parish’s stretched resources prevented the full realisation of Comper’s plans, but the design is nevertheless of some scale and quality, due in no small part to the guidance and interest of Canon Phillips, the parish priest. The interior has an austere and dignified character, its white painted brickwork enlivened by a number of furnishings of note, including a fine  statue  of  the  Virgin  by  Comper,  and  Stations  of  the  Cross  by Anthony Foster.

Read More

Northampton - The Sacred Heart

Modern church built on a budget, of striking external form and with an interior notable above all for its wall paintings.

Read More

Olney - Our Lady Help of Christians and St Lawrence

A church of some architectural interest, as much for the bold reconfiguration  carried  out  in  1990  as  for  the  original  Edwardian design. As a group the buildings make a positive contribution to the Olney Conservation Area although lying just outside the conservation area boundary.

Read More

Oundle - The Holy Name of Jesus

Late  19th   century  church  built  for  Anglican  worship,  from  designs  by (Sir) Arthur Blomfield. The adoption of the Byzantine ‘quincunx’ or inscribed cross plan was an ingenious response to the island site location. Built of good quality local materials.

Read More

Princes Risborough - St Teresa of the Child Jesus

A landmark church, built from designs by the Piedmontese-Welsh architect Giuseppe Rinvolucri. The brick-built church has an unusual plan form and silhouette. The plan is a triangle interpenetrating a hexagon, with six apsidal projections giving off a central space, three of them semicircular and three of them attenuated triangles. A hexagonal dome rises over the central space. The central dome suggests Byzantine influences, such as S Vitale, Ravenna or Sta Sophia. However, the geometry of the plan is more Baroque, recalling Borromini’s church of St  Ivo  in  Rome.  The  church  has  been  somewhat  altered,  with  the internal arrangements turned around by 180 degrees in the 1970s, and more recently a large new entrance addition has been built. The contemporary presbytery has also been greatly altered. However, the church interior contains some notable original furnishings in the chapel of St Teresa, as well as significant later enrichments by Rosamund Fletcher, Stephen Foster and Joseph Nuttgens.

Read More

Raunds - St Thomas More

A typical late-19th  century Nonconformist simple Gothic brick chapel, acquired for Catholic use in 1967. A building of some local architectural and historic interest.

Read More

Rothwell - St Bernadette

The 1959 church, though modest, was of distinctive design. The 1993 alterations have radically altered the appearance, to its detriment.

Read More

Rushden - St Peter

A  modest  basilican  1950s  church  by  Sebastian  Comper,  sensitively enlarged in the 1960s. Simple but well designed.

Read More

Shefford - St Francis of Assisi

Shefford was the focus of Catholic continuity in Bedfordshire during the 18th century, and a chapel was built here as soon as it became legal to do so. Part of that building is said to survive behind the present church, which dates from 1882-84 and was built from the designs of S.J. Nicholl at the expense of Mrs Yolande Lyne-Stephens, a major benefactor of building projects in the Diocese of Northampton. The church occupies a town centre location and with its contemporary adjacent presbytery and the former boys’ home forms a cleverly planned and important group of historic buildings at the heart of Shefford conservation area. The church interior is richly furnished and little altered, with a particularly stunning stone reredos on the east wall.

Read More

Slough - Our Lady Immaculate and St Ethelbert

A fine landmark church, its design inspired by the medieval churches of Norfolk. The building has a tall, spacious interior and a number of furnishings of note. The presbytery is almost contemporary and is built of similar materials. However, the setting of the church is marred by the location at the edge of a busy roundabout.

Read More

Slough - St Anthony

A vast building reflecting the scale and ambition of much post-war Catholic church building. It is a very late example of an Italianate Basilican church on a longitudinal plan, built at the time of the Second Vatican Council. The interior impresses by its sheer volume, but does not contain any furnishings of particular note.

Read More

Slough - The Holy Family

A very plain church of the late 1950s by Sebastian Comper, made more interesting by the narthex addition and new furnishings of 2005.

Read More