Stony Stratford - St Mary Magdalene

A plain structure of the 1950s occupying a fairly prominent position in the local conservation area, but not making a particularly positive contribution to the character of the area. There are some furnishings of note.

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Thrapston - St Paul

A striking design, the high-pitched roof form a type popular for smaller parish churches in the mid-1960s. The church is prominently located in the street, and the internal arrangement is well thought out and functional.

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Toddington - St Elizabeth of Hungary

A charming and homely little church, given by a local benefactor and formed from a converted outbuilding.

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Towcester - St Thomas More

A typical mid 19th century Nonconformist chapel converted for Catholic worship in the 1970s.

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Wellingborough - Our Lady of the Sacred Heart

One of several churches in the Diocese by the London architect S.J. Nicholl. The church is distinguished by some highly original details, and has a largely intact and lavishly finished interior.

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Wellingborough - St Edmund Campion

Architecturally not a distinguished example of 1970s church building but of some interest as an example of the Post-War trend of combining churches with halls or schools, still with the dividing screens available and in use.

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Wendover - St Anne

A simple functional church of the early 1960s, extended in the 1980s, and a notable example of shared use of church premises.

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St Edmund of Abingdon - Westcott

A modest former Baptist chapel, the brickwork giving it the industrial character of a railway mission.

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Woburn Sands - St Mary

Brick-built Gothic church, one of many such built in the Diocese in the 1950s and early 60s by J. S. Comper. The church was built on a large site acquired from the Bedford estate, and a major benefaction from Miss Christine Chichester allowed for a quality of design and fitting not normally possible in the late 1950s.

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Wolverton - St Francis de Sales

A small mission church of the 1860s, possibly built to double up as a school, with attractive and somewhat ‘Rogueish’ Gothic detail. It is hidden away in a back alley behind the slightly later presbytery. The site lies at the heart of the early development of the railway town, now designated as a conservation area. The interior contains a remarkable recent scheme of mural decoration.

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