Alfreton - Christ the King

The building complex forms a readily identifiable group on a principal route in Alfreton. The core of the building is a simple brick church of 1927,  but  the  attractive  original  design was  altered  and  overlaid  by utilitarian additions in 1982.

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Allestree - Church of the Holy Family

Holy Family Allestree is typical of the more modest church buildings constructed in the post-war years to serve Derby’s rapidly expanding suburban estates. Originally intended for use as a parish hall, the building’s interior was skilfully adapted in the 1990s to create an attractive series of well-lit worship and ancillary spaces.   The building has simple modern fittings dating from the 1970s and 1990s, with good stained glass by John Dean.

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Alveston - English Martyrs

A fairly large mid-20th century church in the stripped Romanesque- Byzantine  style  favoured  by  its  architects,  Reynolds  &  Scott.  The building has good qualities of massing but it was not completed to the original design and some alterations detract from the original composition.  The  vaulted  interior  and  simple  unmoulded  arches  are well-handled and impart a sense of space and dignity. The recent apse and pulpit paintings are of high quality and the recent war memorial is also a notable artefact.

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Ashbourne - All Saints

A modest red brick Gothic structure of 1888 by Edward Simpson of Bradford, who worked widely for the Catholic Church in the north of England. It has recently been sympathetically extended. The gate piers and railings are listed structures.

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Ashby-de-la-Zouch - Our Lady of Lourdes

This  is  a  very  handsome  church,  paid  for  by  and  built  under  the auspices of two noble Catholic families with strong local connections. The designer, Frederick Walters, was a distinguished Roman Catholic architect who was responsible for a number of churches in the Romanesque style, of which this is considered the best. The design of the building is assured and the standard of finish is high.  In addition, the building makes a strong contribution to the local townscape and the character of the Ashby Conservation Area.

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Aspley - St Teresa of Lisieux

An unusual design, with a hyperbolic paraboloid roof and internal lighting influenced by major contemporary buildings such as the Commonwealth Institute and Coventry Cathedral. The church was built at the time of the Second Vatican Council, and reflects the influence of ideas about liturgy and design engendered by the Council.

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Aylesbury - The Guardian Angels

1960s  portal  framed  church  built  to  serve  a  large  post-war  housing estate. Not of special architectural or historical interest.

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Aylestone - St Edward the Confessor

A church of very modest architectural interest, designed for the Dominicans by a local architect and built by Frederick Bradford, a Leicester builder who was a prominent figure in Catholic church building in the mid-20th century.

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Bakewell - The English Martyrs (Chapel of Ease)

A good example of a relatively intact early  Victorian  Nonconformist church. The building contributes to the character of the area and to the range and diversity of historic buildings in the town.

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Bardney - St Francis of Assisi (Chapel of Ease)

A modest temporary structure adapted from an agricultural use. It has an intimate charm but is of no architectural or historic importance.

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Barton-upon-Humber - St Augustine Webster

Built in 1988, replacing a church of 1938, this is a utilitarian design which does not do justice to its important, elevated position in the conservation area. The old brick boundary wall is a prominent element in the townscape, and the surviving 1930s presbytery is of some design quality, albeit altered.

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Beeston - Newman House

Late 19th century semi-detached house of some architectural quality, but unsympathetically altered and poorly maintained.

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Beeston - The Assumption

A church in the modern Romanesque style widely adopted for Catholic churches in the middle years of the 20th  century, extended in matching style in the 1970s. The church occupies a prominent location at the civic heart  of  Beeston  and  is  given  a  commanding  presence  by  its  broad, squat tower.

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Belper - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A stone-built church of the early 2oth century, re-using materials for former  service  buildings  attached  to  Gibfield  House.  The  church  is almost chapel-like in its external simplicity and is an uncharacteristically  low-key  design  by  J.  Sydney  Brocklehurst.  It makes   a   positive   contribution   to   the   Belper   Conservation   Area, although the concrete tile roof is regrettable.

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Bilborough - St Hugh of Lincoln

A 1960s church of modest design, the testing ground for the larger and more structurally adventurous St Teresa’s, Aspley (qv). The church has some furnishings attributed to David John and pews from Nottingham Cathedral.

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Birstall - St Theresa

A   modern   church   dating   from   1987   which   provides   a   large   and convenient worship space with a hall attached

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Bolsover - St Bernadette

A stone built church of striking roof form, one of a series of interesting 1960s designs in the Diocese by John Rochford, which makes a positive contribution to the Bolsover Conservation Area.

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Borrowash - St Hugh

A modest post-war chapel, built largely with voluntary effort, altered and extended at various times.

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Boston - St Mary

A  typical  example  of  the  simple  Pre-Emancipation  Regency  type  of chapel that predominated before the surge of building and the Gothic revival of the 1840s onwards. The external appearance of the church has been marred by a porch addition of the 1970s. There is a contemporary attached presbytery.

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Boultham, Lincoln - St Peter and St Paul

A good 1960s church of striking design, one of the best of many built in the Diocese from designs by Reynolds & Scott, but not outstanding for its time

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