New Ollerton - St Joseph

Church built in the 1990s on a relatively low budget, but with a bright and welcoming internal character.

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Newark - Holy Trinity

A church built in the late 1970s, with a somewhat fortified external air, striking octagonal plan and atmospheric internal lighting effects.

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Nottingham - Bishop's House

Handsome  late  19th   century  detached  red  brick  house,  which  despite some   alterations   forms   a   significant   and   integral   part   of   the Nottingham Park Conservation Area.

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Nottingham - Cathedral Church of St Barnabas

The Cathedral church of the Diocese. Built in one phase by A.W.N Pugin with his builder George Myers, and funded in part by Pugin’s patron Lord Shrewsbury. The stone-built Cathedral and its 150 ft spire are conspicuous landmarks on the Derby Road to the west of Nottingham city  centre. It is  designed in Early English style rather than Pugin’s favoured Middle Pointed, the design inspired in part by the medieval Cistercian house at Croxton, Staffordshire. By contrast with the simplicity of the exterior, the original design of the interior was one of great richness and colour. This has undergone several transformations, attempting variously to dilute or reinstate something of the colour and atmosphere intended by Pugin; the most recent reordering and redecoration (1993) was very much a reinstatement of that character. The   main   volumes   of   Pugin’s   interior   survive,   and   notably   his decorative scheme for the Blessed Sacrament chapel (restored in 1933). There are also later features of interest. The contemporary boundary wall and presbytery (now Cathedral House) form a good group with the Cathedral. The 1960s extension to Cathedral House and the Cathedral Hall of the 1970s are not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Nottingham - Divine Infant of Prague (Chapel of Ease)

A modern utilitarian structure, not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Nottingham - Our Lady and St Patrick in the Meadows

A  modern  church  of  hexagonal  design  serving  a  post-war  housing estate. Not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Nottingham - St Paul

A modest Gothic church of 1929 considerably enlarged and extended in the 1960s. The most notable features of the church are the font, said to have come from the local Cluniac priory, the hammerbeam-style roof, remarkably old-fashioned for its date, and the campanile is something of a local landmark.

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Nottingham - The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus

Nicely detailed church of the early 1930s in Italian Basilican style, one of several churches in the Diocese built by F.J. Bradford of Leicester, and similar to Sacred Heart, Leicester (1924, qv). The interior is particularly impressive. The earlier (1883) church adjoins and forms an attractive group with the presbytery.

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Nottingham - Willson House

Commercial 1960s office building, lying in a sensitive location to the west of the Cathedral, but not of special interest and identified by the City Council as a negative feature of the conservation area.

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Oakham - St Joseph

A simple and functional modern complex combining church, hall and presbytery, designed by a local architect who built widely in the Diocese in the 1960s. It is a virtual copy of that for his earlier church at Deeping St James.

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Old Glossop - All Saints

A good example of a late Georgian church, built in 1836 in Greek Revival style. Paid for by the 12th  Duke of Norfolk, the church and the contemporary presbytery, known as Royle House, are notable examples of the early Catholic Revival, expressing increased confidence boosted by aristocratic patronage.   The church is an early work of the Sheffield architects Weightman and Hadfield. The interior of the church bears similarities to Joseph Ireland’s church at Hassop (qv) and retains its original spatial character and some good late 19th  century fittings, but has been somewhat compromised by the 1960s-1970s sanctuary reordering and current decorative treatment.

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Old Normanton - St George and All Soldier Saints

A handsome Italianate design by J.S. Brocklesby, built shortly after the end of the First World War. Structural problems meant that the church was substantially rebuilt within seven years of its opening, but the external  form  was  little  altered  in the  rebuilding  and  the  campanile remains a local landmark. The church was built as a memorial to the 48 parishioners who died in the Great War.

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Osgodby - Our Lady and St Joseph (Chapel of Ease)

The oldest surviving church in use in the Diocese.  A small and evocative house and chapel built soon after the passing of the Second Catholic Relief Act of 1791, but displaying a continuing and prudent reticence. The building has been altered, notably in the mid-19th century, but nevertheless  retains a character redolent of a  time when the Roman Catholic Church was emerging from the shadows.

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Our Lady of Lincoln and St Guthlac (Chapel of Ease) - Deeping St James

An  interesting  design  of  the  1960s,  somewhat  compromised  by  the filling  in  of  the  porch.  The  medieval  font,  statue  of  the  Virgin  and crucifix are of considerable interest. Wilson’s later church at Oakham is a copy of his design for Deeping St James.

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Radcliffe-on-Trent - St Anne

A modest structure built as a church hall, which has been altered and adapted over the years.

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Rainworth - St George

A  portal  framed  structure  of  1960,  not  of  special  architectural  or historic importance.

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Ripley - St Joseph

A building of 1928, adopting a traditional form, loosely Italianate with some Gothic detail. The church has character and presence in the local scene.

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Rothley - The Sacred Heart (Chapel of Ease)

A modest brick chapel of the 1920s, one of a large number built in the Diocese by the Leicester builder F.J. Bradford.

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Scraptoft - The Rosary Church (Chapel of Ease)

A building of modest architectural interest erected in the 1950s to serve the needs of the new Nether Hall housing estate on the northeast outskirts of Leicester.

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Scunthorpe - Holy Souls

A handsome early 20th  Gothic church by Edmund Kirby & Sons, their only church in the Diocese of Nottingham, and striking for its use of moulded brick and terracotta for the tracery and mouldings. Most of the furnishings are later, but all cohere well together, and there has been some recent reinstatement of lost historical detail and character.

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