Bourne - St Gilbert

Interesting for its plan form but not otherwise distinguished and clearly built to a tight budget.

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Brigg - St Mary

A large church of unusual plan form, designed at the time of the Second Vatican Council to accommodate the needs of the new liturgy.

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Broadbottom - The Immaculate Conception

A small rural church in an attractive landscaped setting, built in Gothic Revival style in the 1890s to serve the growing industrial community of Broadbottom. The church is a local landmark, stone-built and notable for its little altered interior with a fine set of Gothic altars by Boulton of Cheltenham.

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Bulwell - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A fine interwar design in Romanesque-Basilican style, little altered and with a good set of furnishings, including a monumental mosaic in the chancel possibly by Ludwig Oppenheimer.

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Burton-on-Trent - St Joseph the Worker (Chapel of Ease)

The church occupies the former Winshill Institute, a late 19th  century building of some local historical interest.

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Burton-on-Trent - The Holy Rosary

A former Methodist chapel standing on a locally prominent site. Of standard design for the date (1907), the building is not of special architectural or historic interest, but contributes to the historic character of the area and is outwardly little-altered.

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Buxton - St Anne

This Gothic Revival church of 1861 is a late work of the notable Catholic architect J. J. Scoles. Part of a group of Victorian parish buildings, the medium-sized town church is a significant feature in Buxton conservation area.  The interior is notable for some good quality fittings from the late 19th century including the sanctuary reredos and pulpit.

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Caistor - St Thomas More (Chapel of Ease)

A modern church housed in an extended 19th  century former printing works.  The  chief  significance  of  the  building  lies  less  in  its  special interest as a church, which is very modest, but in the townscape contribution of the original building, and its location within the former Roman town.

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Calverton - St Anthony

A   modern   neo-Vernacular   design,   nicely   detailed   and   built   with flexibility in mind.

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Castle Donington - The Church of the Risen Lord (Chapel of Ease)

A modern functional structure, not of architectural or historical significance.

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Chaddesden - St Alban

A good example of the many large Catholic churches built to serve post- war suburban estates. It is in the round-arched, austere, massive style so popular with Catholic churches in the mid-20th  century, and which were designed in great number by the church’s architects Reynolds & Scott.  The  re-ordering  of  the  1980s  by  Peter  Langtry  Langton  was radical yet sympathetic, removing 1960s accretions and retaining the character  of  the interior  whilst adding some  features  of high  design quality.

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Chapel-en-le-Frith, High Peak- St John Fisher and St Thomas More

The small church is an attractive feature in an inter-war residential area, faced in local stone, designed in a simple Gothic Revival architectural style and domestic in scale. The interior is well- proportioned and lit, and retains a set of pine pews. The sanctuary has recently been re-ordered using salvaged and new fittings, as part of a return to a more traditional liturgy.

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Charley - Abbey Church of Our Lady and St Bernard

Mount St Bernard was the first abbey to be founded in England since the Reformation.    This Cistercian foundation occupies a complex of buildings designed originally by A.W.N. Pugin in 1839 but enlarged and adapted over the following century by several different architects. The abbey church contains some fittings of high quality, including work by the sculptor Eric Gill. The abbey is the centre of a working monastic community and a significant feature in the landscape of North West Leicestershire.

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Clay Cross - St Patrick and St Bridget (Chapel of Ease)

A modest late 19th   century brick chapel, serving a  coal  mining  area, much altered in the 1980s.

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Cleethorpes - Corpus Christi

A  modern  polygonal  building  of  pleasing  design,  incorporating  a number of features from the previous (1930) church.

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Clifton, Nottingham - Corpus Christi

Large angular church, Gothic in spirit if not in detail, built by Reynolds & Scott in the mid 1960s to serve a new housing estate. The church was one of the first in the Diocese to be conceived and designed with the reforms of the Second Vatican Council in mind. It is notable for its large and complete sanctuary and for a fine set of Stations of the Cross. The tapering concrete campanile is a local landmark.

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Coalville - St Wilfrid of York

A 1950s church of conventional plan form, with modern construction techniques. It has a concrete frame, buff brick cladding and simple window openings and a broad and simply furnished interior. The building has some architectural interest and preserves much of its original character.

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Cotgrave - Our Lady of Grace

A modern and utilitarian design, not of special interest.

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Crowle - St Norbert

A church and contiguous house by Hadfield & Son, one of several Catholic churches built in North Lincolnshire by these architects and paid for by Thomas Young of Kingerby Hall. The church was served by Norbertines or Premonstratensians, this being the first community to be established in England after the Reformation. The church contains a number of furnishings of note and with the house forms a good group in the conservation area, although the house has been marred by unsympathetic recent alterations.

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Derby - St Joseph

A functional design of the 1980s with a fairly striking interior.

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