Luddington - St Joseph and St Dympna

A   charming,   modest   Gothic   chapel   built   in   the   1870s   for   Irish agricultural workers.

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Lutterworth, Leicester - Our Lady of Victories and St Alphonsus

This modest building is one of a number of dual purpose school-chapels built by C.G. Wray in the 1880s. It has been largely submerged by modern additions, but something of the character of the original building survives inside.

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Mablethorpe - St Joseph

A modest and very late Gothic Revival church, built immediately before the Second World War. It incorporates two holy water stoups said to have come from Louth Abbey

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Mackworth - Christ the King

A good example of a post-War  church built to serve a new housing estate, with an inventive plan and dramatic internal spaces.

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Mackworth - Diocesan Centre, attached to church of Christ the King

A standard design of the period, of some note as an early example of a multipurpose  structure,  originally  accommodating  a  church,  parish hall and school.

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Mansfield - St Patrick

 An economical design of the 1980s which is given some interest by its hexagonal plan form and varied roof profiles.

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Mansfield - St Philip Neri

Mansfield’s  answer  to  the  London  Oratory.  Built  on  land  given  by Bishop Bagshawe, an Oratorian, this is a bold and triumphant exercise in Italian baroque, with a particularly rich internal decorative scheme by the Hardman firm. The exterior is more retrained, but the church and attached contemporary presbytery nevertheless make a powerful contribution to the local townscape.

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Market Bosworth - Our Lady and St Gregory (Chapel of Ease)

The church of Our Lady and St Gregory is a functional design, some Gothic detailing denoting ecclesiastical use.

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Market Harborough - Our Lady of Victories

A relatively modest red brick Gothic church of the 1870s, forming part of a complex of Catholic buildings. The church was enlarged in the 1890s and again enlarged and completely refurbished in the early 21st century. It now represents a very interesting fusion of Victorian and 21st century Gothic architecture.

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Market Rasen - Holy Rood

A church largely rebuilt in the 1860s, but incorporating the volume of the nave, part of the west wall and the presbytery from E. J. Willson’s earlier church 0f 1824 (which itself replaced a chapel, on another site, built in 1782). The 1860s rebuilding was by Hadfield & Son of Sheffield at the expense of Thomas Arthur Young of Kingerby Hall, and was one of several churches built in this part of the Diocese by Hadfield & Son at Young’s expense. The church is built of polychromatic brick, and in its mixture of Gothic and classical massing, of pointed and round-arched motifs, denotes a  move away from the more ecclesiologically-correct Gothic normally associated with the work of the practice. This may be connected to the decision to incorporate part of the earlier, classical chapel. The church contains a number of furnishings of note, but its character has been seriously eroded by the replacement in about 1980 of the roofs by a new roof of crude, agricultural design. The church forms a good group with the presbytery buildings and nearby Gothic schoolhouse and lies within a spacious churchyard setting on the western approach to the town centre.

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Market Warsop - St Teresa of the Child Jesus

A modern church and hall on a raised site. One of a series of churches in the Diocese by John Rochford, who experimented with a variety of interesting  roof  forms.  The interior is welcoming  and attractive;  the exterior rather more forbidding, and let down by some poor materials and finishes.

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Marple Bridge - St Mary

An  attractive  mid-Victorian group  of  church,  presbytery  and  school, designed in a simple domestic Gothic style and built by  the Howard family, major patrons of Catholic building in the area. The group makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area. Internally, the most notable features are the triple arcade of the sanctuary and some good furnishings of the 1870s and later.

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Matlock - Our Lady and St Joseph

A modest Gothic Revival church of the 1880s, built of local stone, with later additions and alterations. The church lies within the Matlock Bank Conservation Area.

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Measham - St Charles Borromeo

A new building itself of little architectural importance, incorporating some elements from its predecessor built in 1881.

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Melbourne - Our Lady of Mercy and St Philip Neri

This is a modest early 20th  century chapel built by the Kerr family of Melbourne Hall and adjacent to their park wall.   The half-timbered gables and terracotta dressings enhance the visual impact of this small building.

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Melton Mowbray - St John the Baptist

A charming small church by the Lincolnshire builder and antiquary E. J. Willson which is associated with A.W.N. Pugin, whose influence can perhaps be seen in the high quality detailing of the exterior and in some of the fittings. The original character of the interior has been somewhat compromised by later 20th century alterations.

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Melton Mowbray - St Peter

A concrete-framed church typical of the 1960s which retains something of its original interior character.

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Mickleover - Our Lady of Lourdes

A striking modern church on a polygonal plan, the interior an attractive space.

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Narborough - St Pius X

A  modest  concrete-framed  building  dating  originally  from  the  late 1950s, originally built as a dual-purpose church and church hall, with some later minor alterations.

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New Mills - The Church of the Annunciation

Puginian Gothic church designed by the notable Catholic architects Weightman & Hadfield. It is part of a good local group of mid 19th century   Catholic   churches   by   the   firm   that   includes   St   Charles Borromeo and St Joseph  Stockport. The sanctuary has been re-ordered but the building retains some good fittings.  The spire is a landmark in the conservation area.

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