Cullompton - St Boniface

A very small inter-war church in a free, vaguely Hispanic style, with a cross wing which may originally have served a domestic purpose.

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Dartmouth - St John the Baptist

Modest Gothic Revival town centre church by J.A. Hansom, with gabled west front giving straight onto the street. There are some internal furnishings of note, including two ornate stone reredoses, but the primary importance of the church perhaps lies in the contribution it makes to the conservation area. In the words of the list description, the church and presbytery ‘add variety to an attractive street of predominantly 19th century architecture’.

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Dawlish - St Agatha

Early 20th century church in lancet Gothic style by Scoles and Raymond, who built widely in the Diocese. The church and presbytery form a good townscape group in the Dawlish conservation area, but the primary interest of the church lies in the quality and completeness of its early fittings. 

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Dorchester - Holy Family

A good Victorian church of individual design by a mainstream Victorian church architect who designed several buildings inDorchester. Some fine interior features.

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Exeter - Blessed Sacrament

An interesting and highly inventive inter-war church, apparently designed by Fr Tymons, parish priest of the time, richly fitted out and furnished. The church bears strong similarities to St Paul’s church at Plymouth, built slightly later for Fr Tymons.

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Exeter - Holy Cross

Small inter-war astylar red brick church, built largely at the expense of the original parish priest, from designs of the prolific Wilfrid Mangan. 

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Exeter - Sacred Heart

The church has considerable architectural interest as the earliest surviving work by the architect Leonard Stokes.  The building has a handsome interior with a rich collection of late 19th century fittings.

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Exmouth - Holy Ghost

A substantial church by Scoles and Raymond, who built widely in the Diocese.  The interior has considerable dignity.

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Falmouth - St Mary Immaculate

A highly successful fusion of French Gothic and Burgundian Romanesque styles by Joseph Hansom and his son. The tower is an unconventional but powerful design and local landmark, and the church and contemporary presbytery together make a positive contribution to the Falmouth conservation area. Internal furnishings of note include two early or original granite altars, as well as stained glass and an altar canopy by Fr Charles Norris of Buckfast Abbey.   

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Gillingham -St Benedict

Although of earlier origins this is essentially a structure of 1930 and of no particular architectural distinction. In its use of local stone it sits comfortably in its surroundings.

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Grove, Portland - Our Lady and St Andrew

A modest Victorian church with a façade of some character and a plain and altered interior, by the noted Catholic church architect Joseph Hansom. There is a contemporary presbytery attached.

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Hartland - Our Lady and St Nectan

A simple modern prefabricated timber structure of limited architectural interest.

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Hayle - St Joseph

A modest Baptist chapel of c1870, adapted for Catholic use in 1958. The church retains some of its original fittings, and has been little altered since its adaptation in the 1950s. 

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Helston - St Mary

Post-war church, one of three built in the Diocese by the Falmouth-based architect Waldo Maitland. The building is remarkable in neither design nor construction, but is well built and fit for purpose.    

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Ilfracombe - Our Lady Star of the Sea

Simple Gothic Revival church of the 1890s, with respectful early 20th century additions, replacing a small chapel by Joseph Hansom. 

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Kingsbridge - Sacred Heart

Former Quaker Meeting House retaining part of its old burial ground, acquired for Catholic use in 1902 and much altered in the later 20th century. The primary architectural and historical significance of the site lies in the burial ground and the contribution made by the front façade to the conservation area. The interior has been rebuilt and while it contains some furnishings of note, is not of special interest. 

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Kingskerswell - St Gregory

A thoughtful and functional design of the 1960s, rebuilt in the 1970s. Portal frame construction, externally clad in brick, with a tall northwest campanile. The plan is of the traditional longitudinal type that was widely abandoned in the later 1960s, not least by the architects of St Gregory’s, whose later buildings tended to be liturgically and architecturally more adventurous. 

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Launceston - St Cuthbert Mayne

A fine and complete early 20th century church, built in local stone but in an exotic (for Cornwall) Byzantine-Romanesque style. The church is the national shrine to St Cuthbert Mayne, martyred at Launceston in 1577.  

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Liskeard - Our Lady and St Neot

The church is of historic interest as an early post-Emancipation chapel of 1830. It was greatly enlarged in the 1860s by Joseph Hansom primarily to accommodate an influx of Irish miners to the Liskeard area. The church was cheaply built and has been somewhat altered, but contains some distinctive furnishings of the 1880s, including a large stained glass window by Mayer of Munich. 

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Looe - Our Lady and St Nicholas

A very simple structure of the 1920s, notable above all as a minor example of the patronage of Amy Imrie (Mother Clare Imrie), the White Star heiress. 

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