Lyme Regis - St Michael and St George

A fine early Gothic Revival church by a noted provincial architect fromBath. Good group of church and attached presbytery set in an attractive garden.

Read More

Lynton - Most Holy Saviour

Early 20th century church by the notable Catholic architect Leonard Stokes, completed by George Drysdale. The external appearance of the church is austere, but the interior is of considerable richness and quality, and includes an imported Roman Baroque Altar. 

Read More

Marnhull - Our Lady

A modest country church with some good furnishings but important above all for its historic interest as an early post-Emancipation church.

Read More

Mawnan Smith - St Edward

Comparatively large church given its isolated village position, built in 1964 from designs by Waldo Maitland. Similar to Maitland’s slightly later church at Helston (q.v.), the building is remarkable in neither design nor construction, but the large west window by the Harry Clarke studio is of some note.  

Read More

Modbury - St Monica

A small and functional design of the early 1960s. The architectural claims of the building are modest, but the church has symbolic value as witness to the revival of Catholic worship within the grounds of the former priory at Modbury.   

Read More

Mullion - St Michael and the Archangel

A very modest structure of the 1920s, extended in the 1930s and 1950s. The most notable external features are the toy-like tower and the granite memorial cross to Fr Joseph Dobbeleers, the Belgian priest who established the mission. The interior is notable for the murals and furnishings introduced by Fr Dobbeleers, and for some fine pews. 

Read More

Newquay - Most Holy Trinity

Modest stone-built early 20th century church built by A. J. C. Scoles on land given by the Molesworth family. The building has been much altered and added to over the years.   

Read More

Newton Abbot - St Joseph

A large town church built in 1915 by the prolific firm of Scoles and Raymond, in their favoured (and by then decidedly old-fashioned) 13th century Gothic style. The church replaced, and possibly incorporates part of, a church built in 1870, from which time the adjoining presbytery may date. The chancel was never built, giving the liturgical east end a plain external and a truncated internal appearance. There was a major reordering in 1980.  

Read More

Okehampton - St Boniface

A scheme for an ambitious church with southwest tower was not realised, and the church as built is a modest flat-roofed adjunct to an attractive interwar presbytery, which makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

Read More

Padstow - St Saviour and St Petroc

A small and entirely functional design of the 1970s, in an idyllic position in a large churchyard overlooking the town, close to Prideaux Place.  

Read More

Paignton - Sacred Heart

A large and handsome inter-war church in the Basilican Romanesque style by Wilfrid Mangan, a well-known and prolific Catholic architect.  A re-ordering of the east end has not diminished the quality of the interior.

Read More

Penzance -The Immaculate Conception of Our Lady

The westernmost Catholic church in the country, described soon after  its construction as ‘the best ecclesiastical fabric in the Diocese of Plymouth’. A large church built in the Perpendicular Gothic style in 1843, its west front is a lively composition of considerable sophistication. Inside, the most noteworthy features are the fine timber roof over the main space, and the granite and serpentine high altar designed by Joseph Hansom. The south aisle was added later and the north aisle remains unbuilt.  

Read More

Perranporth - Christ the King

A 1930s timber church, extended in the 1970s. While of no great architectural importance, it does contain some good stained glass by Dom Charles Norris.

Read More

Plymouth - Christ the King

Very late Arts and Crafts Gothic Revival church, built at the expense of a private benefactor on land given by the City Council. This was Giles Gilbert Scott’s last church, and the last Gothic Revival church to be built in the Diocese of Plymouth. It was opened in 1962, just as the Second Vatican Council was convening. The church interior is a design of particular quality and refinement, with furnishings of high quality, and is very little altered. With the slightly later church hall and presbytery, (by Scott’s son Richard) the church occupies a prominent island site in the Hoe Conservation Area and a significant place in the post-war redevelopment of Plymouth city centre. 

Read More

Plymouth - Holy Cross

Church built in 1881 out of materials from the former Catholic Church at Teignmouth, dismantled to make way for Brunel’s Great Western Railway. Considerably altered and added to in the later 19th and early 20th century, and it is likely that all that remains of the 1881 church is the west front of the nave. The interior is not remarkable, but contains some features of interest; the primary importance of the building lies in its historical associations and in its contribution to the local townscape.  

Read More

Plymouth - Holy Family

A functional design of the 1950s by a local architect. The intended campanile would have given the church more of a local presence. 

Read More

Plymouth - Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St Teresa

 Church and former convent buildings, not of special architectural or historical interest.

Read More

Plymouth - Our Most Holy Redeemer

Large late Gothic Revival church originally built for naval personnel and their families. Burnt out in a 1941 air raid and subsequently restored, the church is something of a local landmark.  

Read More

Plymouth - St Edward the Confessor

Early 20th century church and presbytery, the former considerably enlarged in Classical style in the 1930s. The building occupies a prominent semi-island site and while the exterior is rather severe, the interior is of real quality. 

Read More

Plymouth - St Joseph

Attractive and functional modern church incorporating features from Joseph Hansom’s previous church in Devonport.

Read More