Plymouth - St Mary and St Boniface Cathedral

The Cathedral church of the Diocese, when built perhaps the grandest of the new, purpose-built Catholic cathedrals. The design is by Charles and Joseph Hansom (Joseph’s first church) and, like Charles’ slightly earlier cathedral at Nottingham, is in the Early English style. The spire was added later, also from the Hansoms’ designs. The interior has been reordered at various times over the years (most recently, and most radically, in 1994) but includes a number of important furnishings, including a Hardman brass to Bishop Vaughan, Stations of the Cross by Joseph Cribb and good side altars. The Cathedral forms a good group with the contemporary Bishop’s House and School to the south, and is a landmark building on the eastern side of the city. 

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Plymouth - St Paul

Interwar church in an eclectic basilican style, with a handsome west front of red brick and Portland stone. The result of the patronage of the Misses Robinson, who paid for a number of churches in the Diocese of Plymouth, and the architectural tastes of the parish priest, Fr Tymons. Post-Vatican II reordering resulted in the loss of a number of internal furnishings of interest, but the interior remains an impressive space. 

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Plymouth - St Thomas More

Post war church serving the Southway estate. Not of particular architectural or historic significance. 

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Plympton - Our Lady of London

An unpretentious inter-war church by Leonard Drysdale in the Arts and Crafts tradition, built as a memorial to Bishop Keily. Lack of funds necessitated a downgrading of the original specification, and the building is not of the same quality as Drysdale’s slightly later church at Weymouth. 

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Plymstock - St Margaret Mary

A good functional design of the 1960s, the fruit of collaboration between Paul Pearn (the architect) and Dom Charles Norris (stained glass), who later worked together to more dramatic effect at Buckfast Abbey. 

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Poole - Our Lady of Fatima

An unexceptional brick built church with a pleasant interior but of no architectural importance.

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Poole - St Anthony of Padua

A modest 1950s church of little architectural pretension. The interior has a quiet simplicity but has no fixtures or furnishings of aesthetic significance.

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Poole - St Joseph and St Walburga

Architecturally of its time: modern in style, traditional in plan. The church is distinguished by its original and more recent artefacts, the John Green Stations of the Cross, the font, Buckfast stained glass and carved statues.

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Poole - St Mary

1970s church of polygonal design, the interior an impressive volume. 

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Redruth - The Assumption

Simple structure built in the 1930s as a parish hall and temporary church. 

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Salcombe - Our Lady Star of the Sea

A modest brick church of the post-war period.

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Saltash - Our Lady of the Angels

A new church, perhaps not immediately recognisable as a place of worship, but nevertheless a distinctive design, displaying fashionable obeisance to environmental sustainability and Cornish nationalist sentiment. 

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Sclerdel - Our Lady of Light

Sclerder has had a chequered history, with many different users, both religious and secular. It originates from the 1840s, being the legacy of Sir Harry Trelawney, a convert who was well connected with some of the leading figures of the ‘Second Spring’ of English Catholicism.  One of these was Ambrose Phillips de Lisle, a trustee of the church built here in the 1840s, possibly from designs by A.W. Pugin, Phillips’ protégée. For much of the 20th century Sclerder housed a community of Poor Clares,  whose superior in the 1920s was the White Star heiress Amy Imrie, a significant patron of Catholic building enterprises, notably the church of St Mary of the Angels in Liverpool. At Sclerder she paid for the building of the public church, added at right angles to the 1840s church in the 1920s. More recently a community of Carmelite nuns have carried out reordering and installed new stained glass made by the monks of Buckfast Abbey. The church lies at the heart of a small rural complex of 19th century and later conventual buildings.  

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Seaton - St Augustine

A modest inter-war brick church in the Gothic style, very old-fashioned for its date, built by the Augustinian Recollect Fathers.

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Shaldon - St Ignatius of Loyola

Simple late 18th century former Baptist chapel, much altered but nevertheless making a positive contribution to the local conservation area. 

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Sherborne - Sacred Heart and St Aldhelm

A good late Victorian church, if somewhat stylistically old-fashioned. It presents a fine composition to the street. The interior, though not without interest particularly in the sanctuary, is disappointing and a little austere.

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Sidmouth - Most Precious Blood

A 1930s church of some architectural interest, in the round-arched brick basilican style associated with the work of Wilfrid Mangan and others. The 70 ft campanile is a local landmark. 

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South Molton - St Joseph

Modest stone-built Victorian Gothic chapel built for Nonconformist use and acquired for Catholic use in the 1950s. The interior is plain and contains no furnishings of note, while the exterior, although set back from the street and hemmed in by other buildings, makes a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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St Agnes - Our Lady Star of the Sea

A functional building of the late 1950s, of no architectural importance but containing one good stained glass panel, presumed to be by Dom Charles Norris. 

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St Austell - St Augustine of Hippo

Built in 1990, with a light and pleasant interior and containing some good furnishings by David John.  

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