St Ives - Sacred Heart and St Ia

An early 20th century church in French 13th century Gothic style by Scoles and Raymond, who built widely in the southwest. The church and contemporary presbytery are strong townscape features in the St Ives conservation area. The interior is conventional and rather old-fashioned for its date, but contains some furnishings of note, particularly the high altar. On the external wall is a bronze plaque by Fr Norris of Buckfast Abbey, commemorating the death of the mayor of St Ives during the Western Rising of 1549.

Read More

St Mawes - Our Lady Star of the Sea and St Anthony

Stone-built chapel built for the Bible Christians in 1875, sold for Catholic use after the Methodist union. The interior is plain and simple, and the primary interest of the building lies in its external design, particularly the striking shaped gable of the front elevation.  

Read More

Swanage - The Holy Spirit and St Edward

A representative example of the Gothic church output of (Canon) Alexander J. C. Scoles who was prolific in the South Western dioceses between 1875 and 1920 and generally kept to the spirit of mid-Victorian medievalism and the Gothic style of around 1300. The church contains some fine paintings in the sanctuary by Francis Newbery.  
Read More

Tavistock - Our Lady of the Assumption

A major landmark in the town, built in 1865-67 by the 8th Duke of Bedford as an Anglican chapel of ease for workers in the nearby copper mines. In the early 20th century the church declined along with the local copper industry, and was acquired after the Second World War by the Catholic church through the generosity of a local benefactor, Mrs Clare Rye (who also paid for the building of Giles Gilbert Scott’s 1961 church of Christ the King in Plymouth). The architect was Henry Clutton, who built widely for the Duke of Bedford both here and at Woburn, and was also a Catholic convert who built many churches for his adopted Church.  The interior is lofty and impressive, with some furnishings of note.

Read More

Teignmouth - Our Lady and St Patrick

Good and complete Gothic Revival church by Charles Hansom, architect of Plymouth Cathedral, perhaps somewhat old-fashioned for its date but with a lively external composition and a light and spacious interior with several furnishings of note. 

Read More

Tintagel - St Paul the Apostle

Plain late 1960s church, notable above all for a good collection of dalle de verre glass by Dom Charles Norris OSB.

Read More

Tiverton - St James

The first Catholic church in Tiverton dates from 1836, and is of considerable interest. That however has now closed. St James’s is a functional 1960s building of little architectural interest. 

Read More

Torpoint - St Joan of Arc

Modest interwar church of no architectural importance but with a claim to be the first church in England dedicated to St Joan of Arc. 

Read More

Torquay - Holy Angels

A small church, the main interest of which lies in the elaborate architectural elements, such as the main door surround and the handsome sanctuary arch. One of a series of churches built between the wars from designs by, or under the direction of Fr James Tymons.

Read More

Torquay - Our Lady Help of Christians and St Denis

A splendid large church on a prominent site, designed by the distinguished Catholic architect Joseph Hansom, who also designed the adjacent convent school buildings.  The church was built at the expense of a private donor (Mr Potts-Chatto) and is richly ornamented.  Most unusually, it has retained virtually all of its elaborate original fittings.

Read More

Torquay - Our Lady of the Assumption

Rigorous and conventional Gothic Revival design by Joseph Hansom, with a good set of stained glass windows by Hardman. This was the first of a number of churches designed by Hansom for the newly-formed Diocese. Together with the adjoining presbytery and schoolroom (also by Hansom) the church complex forms an important piece of townscape in the Abbey Road Conservation Area. 

Read More

Totnes - St Mary and St George

A functional modern building incorporating some items from the 1902 church it replaced

Read More

Truro - Our Lady of the Portal and St Piran

A dramatic, even Brutalist design of the early 1970s, the last and the best of three churches built in the Diocese by Waldo Maitland of Falmouth. The design and planning of the church evoke the dedication to Our Lady of the Portal and take full advantage of the prominent, sloping site. The interior contains a number of furnishings of note, including five abstract stained glass windows and other pieces by Fr Charles Norris of Buckfast Abbey. 

Read More

Wadebridge - St Michael

Functional post-war building of no architectural or historical interest close to Wadebridge town centre.

Read More

Wareham - St Edward the Martyr

A modest inter-war building of no architectural or artistic significance.

Read More

West Moors - St Anthony

A typical church by Lanner Ltd. ofWakefieldwho built straightforward functional churches in the Post-War period. Fit for purpose but of no architectural importance.
Read More

Weymouth - St Augustine of Canterbury

Plain Georgian chapel aggrandised with a Classical façade of circa 1900 and a more ornately Classical sanctuary of the same date.

Read More

Weymouth - St Joseph

Idiosyncratic and attractive church design of the interwar years by George Drysdale, a pupil and partner of Leonard Stokes.  The church and presbytery were built together, and both are clad in painted brick and roofed in Cornish slate. The tall western bell cote and white painted brickwork give something of the flavour of a Spanish Mission church. Otherwise the church has a more basilican character, but with some attractive and quirky Arts and Crafts touches. Despite the highly regrettable replacement of the church and presbytery windows in PVCu, this is an original design with lots of good detail, which makes a positive contribution to the local scene.    

Read More

Wimbourne - St Catherine

A curious toy-like church looking stylistically more like a building of one hundred years earlier. It is of some architectural interest but probably not of sufficient interest to be listed.

Read More

Wool - St Joseph

An impressive 1960s church design, responding thoughtfully to the needs of the post-Vatican II liturgy. The function clearly dictates the form, resulting in a building that is visually memorable as well as fit for purpose. Little has been changed since 1971. The Triodetic spaceframe roof structure is not generally associated with churches but enables a large uninterrupted space for the celebration of the Mass. The interior furnishings and fittings are essential to the totality of the design.

Read More