Abingdon - Our Lady and St Edmund

A fine example of a Catholic church of the 1850s and 60s built on Puginian principles. The architects, William Wardell and George Goldie, are significant figures in 19th century Catholic church architecture. The church was built at the behest of, and the cost underwritten by Sir George Bowyer, a significant figure in mid-nineteenth century ecclesiastical politics. The quality of Wardell’s work in particular is high; there is an abundance of richly carved stonework, and a good east window, possibly by Hardman.

Read More

Aldershot - St Joseph

Fine early-twentieth century church in basilican style, with applied and integral polychromy, both inside and out. The church makes a powerful contribution to the conservation area, its solid red brick massing and apsidal east end (recalling Albi Cathedral) taking full advantage of the sloping triangular site.

The architect George Drysdale (1881-1949) studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris and then worked in the offices of Ernest George and Leonard Stokes, before starting his own practice in 1911, shortly after which he made the designs for St Joseph’s church. From 1916-19 Drysdale was in Canada, rebuilding the fire-damaged Houses of Parliament in Ottawa. On his return to England he set up partnership with Leonard Stokes until Stokes’ death in 1925. Drysdale was based in Birmingham, and he had a predominantly Catholic church building practice, which included three in Birmingham and others at Weymouth, South Norwood, Ruislip and Bodmin. He specialised in variations on a basilican and Romanesque theme. 

Read More

Aldershot - St Mary

Basilican design, no doubt very old-fashioned for its date. However, the interior is light and elegant.

Read More

Alresford - St Gregory the Great

The church and its associated buildings lie on an attractive sloping site on the southern outskirts of Alresford. Built in 1967-8, the church reflects typical architectural and liturgical interests of the time – a desire to break away from historicism, use modern materials, and achieve modern liturgical planning with a brought-forward altar and a three-sided arrangement for the sittings. The focus on the altar is emphasised by the use of a glazed lantern over it, a device derived from Maguire and Murray’s influential church of St Paul, Bow Common (1958-60), with the use of a steep monopitch lit on one side perhaps owing something to Gillespie, Kidd and Coia’s St Paul, Glenrothes (1956-7). In the diocese of Portsmouth the design is paralleled in the exactly contemporary church of St John Bosco, Woodley, Berkshire.

Read More

Alton - St Mary

One of a large number of new churches built in the wake of the Second Vatican Council, which broke away from the traditional longitudinal plan in favour of experimenting with central planning and polygonal forms. The most distinctive features of the church are the stepped form of the roof, the centrally planned internal space, and the stained glass panels.

The architect Justin Alleyn (1908-83) was educated at Ampleforth College and studied at the Liverpool School of Architecture. His practice was based in London and Reigate, and he designed a number of churches of adventurous plan form and design in the early-mid 1960s.

Read More

Andover - St John the Baptist

Post war church with a light and elegant interior, and some furnishings of note.

Read More

Ascot - St Francis of Assisi

Church built by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles. Scoles (1844-1920) was one of two architect-priest sons of J.J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. He was a Franciscan Tertiary and before coming to Portsmouth diocese, was for twenty-three years in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton.

After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese, where St Francis, Ascot was his first church. He went on to build St Swithun, and St Joseph, both in Portsmouth (1901 and 1914 respectively) and also worked on the west end of the Cathedral. His best work was Holy Ghost, Basingstoke.

Read More

Basingstoke - Holy Ghost

The major church by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles (1844-1920) and his memorial. Scoles was one of two architect-priest sons of J. J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. Before coming to Basingstoke and Portsmouth diocese, Canon Scoles was in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton. After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese, where he designed a number of churches, of which Holy Ghost Basingstoke is the finest.

The church is designed in Scoles’s favoured late-thirteenth century style, and occupies a corner site on rising ground to the north of Basingstoke town centre. There is a substantial contemporary presbytery in Gothic style to the south of the church, and an earlier, more modest chapel (now parish hall) to the east. The interior of the church is lavishly furnished, and is notable in particular for its Westlake paintings and stained glass. It is however marred by the more recent introduction of a western gallery. Scoles lies buried outside the east end of the church. 

Read More

Bembridge - St Michael

The church is one of three Post-War churches in the diocese designed by C. Sheppard of Ryde. It is of no particular architectural or historical distinction.

Read More

Bournemouth - Corpus Christi

A substantial brick church in the Gothic style, built in the late nineteenth century and much enlarged and elaborated in the 1920s.

Read More

Bournemouth - Our Lady Immaculate

The church is of some historic interest for its possible Nonconformist origins and later Catholic use, but the building is not of great architectural interest and has little townscape value.

Read More

Bournemouth - Our Lady Queen of Peace and Blessed Margaret Pole

The church is a good and complete example of the basilican style, which was popular in the mid-twentieth century. The interest of the building is enhanced by the relatively intact interior and the adjacent contemporary presbytery.

Read More

Bournemouth - Sacred Heart

The first Catholic church to be built in Bournemouth. The original church and presbytery were designed by Henry Clutton, a Catholic convert and distinguished Victorian architect, and were greatly enlarged at the end of the nineteenth century by A.J. Pilkington. The building has considerable townscape value, placed picturesquely on a sloping site. The interior preserves much of its original character, despite the enlargement.

Read More

Bournemouth - St Thomas More

The church has some interest, principally for its interior, but is not a building of great architectural or historic importance.

Read More

Bournemouth - The Annunciation

The first independent work of architecture by [Sir] Giles Gilbert Scott, the architect of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, showing an inventive and original use of Gothic forms.

Read More

Bracknell - St Joseph

The church is a good example of church-building ideas around 1960 and was influenced by the architect’s visit to Scandinavia in 1956. The plan is conventional in terms of having a nave and aisles but the language is entirely modern and typical of its time. The triangular shape of the core of the building was chosen, the architect explained, ‘To achieve dignity of height, and at the same time to avoid enormous volumes to heat during the winter months’.

Read More

Brockenhurst - St Anne

The church has some architectural interest as a simple example of the round-arched style which flourished in the first half of the twentieth century.

Read More

Buckland and Faringdon - Blessed Hugh Faringdon

Attractive early-mid chapel, built for Nonconformist use, un-archaeologically Gothic with some hybrid classical detail. Located in the heart of Faringdon, within a designated conservation area, and listed grade II. The interior retains its gallery and a later organ. The church hall, built in the early twentieth century, is also of some architectural interest.

Read More

Chandlers Ford - St Edward the Confessor

The original church is an attractive essay in the Arts & Crafts tradition, by W.H. Randoll Blacking, a pupil of Sir Ninian Comper. It has a low weatherboarded tower and a shingled spire. The church was considerably enlarged in 1989 to designs by Robert Potter, a pupil of Blacking and a major regional post-war church architect. The juxtaposition of the old and the new is bold but successful.

Read More

Christchurch - Immaculate Conception

Modest single-cell Gothic Revival structure of the 1860s, now no longer used for worship. The building makes a positive contribution to the local scene.

Read More