Crowthorne and Sandhurst - Immaculate Conception

A relatively modest structure in buff brick. The church has a typical layout for its time - a rectangular worship area with a narthex at the entrance end, and a sacristy and a utility area at the end of the sanctuary. The interior is dominated by a wide, tall roof and features laminated timber trusses which were also a popular feature of economical churches in the diocese in the 1950s and 1960s.

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Crowthorne and Sandhurst - Holy Ghost

A buff-brick church with a certain amount of distinction both internally and externally. The elevation to the road is the most important visually and achieves an Italianate feel through the detailing of the nave front and, more especially, that of the tower. The church is a key element in the local landscape. The interior is distinguished by tall brick pilasters and arches embracing the windows. 

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East Cowes - St David

The church is one of three Post-War churches in the diocese designed by C.A.F. Sheppard of Ryde. A pleasant building but not one of any architectural distinction.

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East Hendred - St Mary

The epitome of Romantic feudal Catholicism. The church, linked presbytery and school are all by C. A. Buckler, a notable figure in the Gothic Revival, and form an attractive group of buildings to the south of Hendred House. The site has seen continuous Catholic worship since the Middle Ages.

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East Hendred - St Patrick

The church is a converted farm building, and is of attractive rural simplicity, making a positive contribution to the local scene.

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Eastleigh - Holy Cross

Church built by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles. Scoles (1844-1920) was one of two architect-priest sons of J.J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. He was a Franciscan Tertiary and before coming to Portsmouth diocese, was for twenty-three years in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton.

After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese, where St Francis, Ascot was his first church. He went on to build St Swithun, and St Joseph, both in Portsmouth (1901 and 1914 respectively) and also worked on the west end of the Cathedral. His best work was Holy Ghost, Basingstoke.

Holy Cross, Eastleigh is a relatively modest building by Scoles. Finance was evidently tight and the east end was never completed, hence the rendered walls to the sanctuary and Lady Chapel. Its character has been considerably affected by the additions on both sides in 1962.

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Fareham and Portchester - Sacred Heart

Sacred Heart is a small and well-detailed essay in fourteenth century Gothic, along Puginian lines. Its architect, John Crawley is not a major figure on the national scene, although he is prominent in the diocese as the architect for the grade II listed Portsmouth Cathedral as well as St Joseph, Havant (a similar design). He also designed the Catholic Cathedral in Hong Kong (built in 1883-88 by J.S. Hansom after Crawley’s death).

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Fleet - Our Lady

Polygonal 1960s church with interesting internal volume.

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Fordingbridge - SS Mary and Philip

Built in the 1870s to serve a community of Servite friars, and originally intended as dormitory accommodation. The church, attached presbytery and boundary walls are of interest as early examples of mass concrete construction.  

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Gorey, Jersey - Church of the Assumption

Small chapel built for the Bible Christian Methodists, which became a cinema before being acquired by the Catholic Church in 1953. Its architectural qualities have been marred by the cinema addition at the west end and by the replacement of the windows in PVCu, but the building is nevertheless of local architectural, historical and townscape interest. 

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Gosport - St Columba

A modest 1950s church.

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Gosport - St Joseph

St Joseph’s is a former school building of 1920 converted to a church in 1970. The school building does not appear to have been of much architectural pretension and the conversion has not enhanced its architectural character.

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Gosport - St Mary

The history of the church is uncertain, with many conflicting dates and at least two significant phases of construction, the 1850s work, the Gothick character of which suggests an earlier date, and the late nineteenth century work which is in the mainstream Gothic of the period. The earlier work is distinctive and good of its kind, whilst the later work is competent but not exceptional.

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Grayshott - St Joseph

Small and relatively unaltered Perpendicular Gothic design by F.A. Walters, a prolific Catholic architect of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century.

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Havant - St Joseph

St Joseph’s is a competent and relatively unaltered essay in fourteenth century Gothic, along Puginian lines. Its architect, John Crawley is not a major figure on the national scene, although he is prominent in the diocese as the architect for the grade II listed Portsmouth Cathedral as well as The Sacred Heart at Fareham. He was also architect of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Hong Kong (built in 1883-88 after his death).

The church has an impressive interior, with high altar and corbels by Farmer and Brindley, and good stained glass by Hardman and others in the sanctuary. The exterior, with its contemporary presbytery, former school and boundary wall, are an intact and original grouping. However, PVC-u windows have replaced the original windows of the presbytery and former school. The 1957 parish hall is of little architectural interest.

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Havant - St Thomas of Canterbury and St Thomas More

The church is a late 1950s building of limited architectural interest. The stained glass windows are the most notable feature of the interior.

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Hayling Island - St Patrick

The church is an interesting design by Wilfrid Clarence Mangan, working with his elder brother James Henry. W.C Mangan was one of the most prolific Catholic architects of the inter- and post-war years. As with his earlier church at Romsey, St Patrick’s shows Mangan’s early Arts and Crafts tendencies, albeit with a pronounced neo-Romanesque character. The tower is a particularly pleasing element of the composition. As at St Colman’s Portsmouth and his New Milton church, Mangan uses chequerboard patterns, reflecting local vernacular building traditions. His interest in patterned and polychromatic brickwork, which were to find even more elaborate expression in his slightly later churches at Reading and Newbury, is here evident. The 1960s transept extensions contain some interesting stained glass but architecturally do not add to the interest of the building. The later presbytery and church hall have little architectural interest.

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