Hedge End - St Brigid

A small modern church.

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Hook - Sacred Heart

A post-war church.

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Horndean - St Edmund

The church is a late 1950s building with no known architect. Although it is architecturally undistinguished, its original arch-windowed nave is not unpleasing externally.

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Lambourne - Our Lady of Lourdes

A prefabricated pre-War building with an unusual setting in the midst of allotments.

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Liphook - Immaculate Conception

Church built by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles (1844-1920) and his partner, Geoffrey Raymond (1881-1972). Scoles was one of two architect-priest sons of J. J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. Before coming to Portsmouth diocese, Canon Scoles was in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton. After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese. St Joseph’s is his second Portsmouth church (after St Swithun in 1901) and was built shortly after he had added the narthex, porch and turrets at the west end of the Cathedral. His best work is Holy Ghost, Basingstoke (from 1902).

The church at Liphook is later than those churches, and is not built on the same scale, although it has a number of similarities with Holy Ghost Basingstoke. Unlike his earlier churches, which are in the Gothic style of the thirteenth century, Scoles here uses Decorated and Perpendicular detailing. The design, materials and massing of the exterior are pleasing, particularly in the views from the south and west. The interior is fairly plain, the main features being the stained glass and the high altar. The presbytery and parish hall are later buildings of no special interest.

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Liss - St Agnes

The church is a small prefabricated wooden building.

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Lymington - Our Lady of Mercy and St Joseph

The church is a modest example of J. A. Hansom’s work, built under the patronage of the Weld family. It retains much of its original character, both externally and internally, and is part of a historic group in a conservation area.

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Lyndhurst - Our Lady of the Assumption and St Edward the Confessor

A compact Victorian Gothic memorial church by a prominent church architect (although not known as a designer of Catholic churches), with scholarly architectural detailing.

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Maidenhead - St Elizabeth

The church is a modest building, erected to accommodate the needs of Catholics in the area north of Maidenhead. It is an effective, functional space but, being built to a fairly small budget, is low-key architecturally. The use of laminated trusses for the main structure was a very popular feature at the time (cf. the exactly contemporary Our Lady of Peace, Wargrave).

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Maidenhead - St Joseph

Leonard Stokes (1858-1925) was a highly talented Catholic architect who undertook many commissions for his Church. He was articled to S.J. Nicoll in 1874. He went on to spend time in the offices of James Gandy, G.E. Street, J.P. St Aubyn and T.E. Collcutt and commenced independent practice in London in January 1880. He was Pugin Student in 1880 and travelled in Germany in 1881 and Italy in 1882. St Joseph’s is one of his earliest works (the Sacred Heart, Exeter, 1881-6, was begun before St Joseph’s). With J.F. Bentley he was one of the most innovative architects working for the Catholic Church in the last two decades of the nineteenth century.

Stokes’s original design for St Joseph’s, which involved a crossing tower and larger transepts, was never completed. His nave dates from 1884 and is a good, imaginative Decorated piece and has an unusual octagonal porch. His northeast tower and east end of 1913-14 are to a new design. The tower makes much attractive use of interplaying flint, brick and stone, and has an Arts & Crafts character. An extension at the west end of the nave, dating from 1965, presents a very prominent face of the building when approaching from the town, and has done nothing to enhance its appearance. The interior detailing is interesting and original. The east end makes much use of marble and alabaster to create an atmosphere of restrained beauty.

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Milford - St Francis of Assisi

The church has some local historic interest for its original function as the Village Institute, but is not a building of architectural importance.

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Netley Abbey - The Annunciation

The church is a modest structure intended as a hall.

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New Milton - Our Lady of Lourdes

The church is an interesting late Gothic Revival church, drawing upon regional traditions in the design and materials. The architect was Wilfrid Mangan, who had a prolific Catholic practice in the interwar and post-war years, and who was responsible for several churches in Portsmouth diocese. The church has similarities with Mangan’s slightly later church of St Colman, Portsmouth, and both are untypical of Mangan’s work as Gothic, rather than Italian basilican designs. The hammerbeam roof structure of the interior is particularly striking. 

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Newbury - St Francis de Sales

The church is of some architectural and historic interest, being converted from a nineteenth century barn and farm buildings, associated with the farmhouse once known as Warren Lodge. They are a valuable reminder of the former rural character of Wash Common, now largely absorbed within the suburban spread of Newbury. The nave retains the fine original barn roof.

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Newbury - St Joseph

Ambitious town church in Italo-Byzantine style by W.C. Mangan, the design and layout clearly showing the influence of Bentley’s Westminster Cathedral. The church is notable for its external massing, the patterning and colour of its external brickwork and its rich fitting out, with much use of Italian marbles. It is a major local landmark, the campanile and the Sacred Heart statue being particularly prominent.

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Newport - St Thomas of Canterbury

St Thomas of Canterbury is not only a fine example of a Georgian church with a complete galleried interior, largely unaltered in the Victorian period, but is also an extremely early, possibly the earliest, example of a purpose-built Roman Catholic parish church not associated with a private estate.

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North Hinksey - Holy Rood

Holy Rood has been described as ‘a landmark in English Catholic ecclesiology’. Built soon after, and evidently inspired by Maguire and Murray’s St Paul’s, Bow Common, the church is advanced in its liturgical planning and houses a considerable number of furnishings of high quality.

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Pangbourne - Our Lady and St Bernadette

Small 1950s church of some period charm.

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