Park Gate - St Margaret Mary

A 1960s building of some character with some notable furnishings and a sympathetic contemporary extension.

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Petersfield - St Laurence

The church is a striking red brick building in an Italianate style and the church, church hall and presbytery have good group value. The architect, John Kelly, designed a number of Catholic churches around the end of the nineteenth century, including the Grade II* St Patrick, Soho Square, London.

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Portsmouth - Corpus Christi

Late nineteenth century brick church with Perpendicular Gothic detailing, externally plain, but with an attractive spacious interior with some good fittings. Although early and more ambitious plans were not realised, this is nevertheless a church of some architectural and historic interest.

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Portsmouth - Our Lady of Lourdes

Prefabricated church of the 1950s, much altered and extended.

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Portsmouth - St Colman

The church is an interesting late Gothic Revival church, drawing upon regional traditions in the design and materials. The architect was Wilfrid Mangan, who had a prolific Catholic practice in the interwar and post-war years, and who was responsible for several churches in Portsmouth diocese. The church has similarities with Mangan’s slightly earlier church at New Milton. The external design is particularly striking, and the church and contemporary presbytery have good group value.

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Portsmouth - St Joseph

Church built by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles (1844-1920) and his partner, Geoffrey Raymond (1881-1972). Scoles was one of two architect-priest sons of J. J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. Before coming to Portsmouth diocese, Canon Scoles was in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton. After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese. St Joseph’s is his second Portsmouth church (after St Swithun in 1901) and was built shortly after he had added the narthex, porch and turrets at the west end of the Cathedral. His best work is Holy Ghost, Basingstoke (from 1902).

St Joseph’s is an ambitious design in Scoles’s favoured late-thirteenth century style, built in one phase, with an impressive west front and spacious interior. Although altered, the furnishings of the sanctuary remain impressive, as do those of the adjoining chapels.

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Portsmouth - St Swithun

Church built by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles. Scoles (1844-1920) was one of two architect-priest sons of J. J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. Before coming to Portsmouth diocese, Canon Scoles was for twenty-three years in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton. After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese, where his first church was St Francis, Ascot (1888-9). St Swithun was his first Portsmouth church, just preceding St Joseph (1914) and his work at the west end of the Cathedral. His best work is Holy Ghost, Basingstoke (from 1902).

St Swithun is a less ambitious design than Scoles’s later church of St Joseph, Portsmouth. Like that church, it is in the architect’s favoured late-thirteenth century style. Although altered, the furnishings of the sanctuary and adjoining chapels are impressive. The presbytery and school are also of considerable interest.

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Portsmouth Cathedral - Portsmouth

The Cathedral church of the diocese. A substantial red brick and stone Decorated Gothic design by J. A. Crawley, with Stanislaus Hansom and later work by Canon Scoles and W.C. Mangan. Crawley was also architect for two other churches in the diocese, at Havant and Fareham, as well as the Catholic Cathedral in Hong Kong.

Portsmouth Cathedral occupies a prominent corner site, to which it presents a handsome west front. The external massing of the apse is impressive, and there is a good wheel window with flamboyant tracery in the south transept. The interior is dignified, with a number of good fittings. The Cathedral church is the primary element in a complex which includes school, Bishop’s House and Great Hall. 

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Reading - English Martyrs

Church designed by the Preston-based architect, Wilfrid C. Mangan, who worked extensively in Portsmouth diocese. He was an enthusiast for round-arched styles which were highly popular for Catholic churches between the wars. Other such work by him in the diocese is to be found at St Joseph, Romsey (1913), the convent church of the Sacred Heart, Waterlooville (1922-5), St Saviour, Totland Bay (1923), and St Joseph, Newbury (1926-8).

Here he chose an ambitious cruciform, red-brick design in the early Christian Lombardic manner. Distinctive Italianate features are the widely overhanging eaves, northwest campanile, and octagonal crossing tower. The concave buttresses to the clerestory also add to the visual interest. The church is a significant landmark on a prominent corner site at the junction of Tilehurst Road and Liebenrood Road.

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Reading - Sacred Heart

Church, originally Anglican, of 1872-5 in an exuberant, High Victorian thirteenth century style by the little-known W. Allen Dixon. This is his only known Anglican church (his Baptist church, Edgware, c.1872 survives; another Baptist church in Hampstead, 1878 has been demolished).

It is an ambitious and costly landmark building, and its lavish ornament and strong polychromy make a striking display. The muscular Gothic school to the south adds much to the ensemble. The church has not experienced any significant change and is little altered from when it was first built.

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Reading - St James

Church of 1837-40 and important as an early work by A.W.N. Pugin, the hugely influential promoter of the Gothic Revival and a recent convert (1834) to the Catholic Church. Unusually St James’s finds him working in a neo-Norman idiom, perhaps as a reference back to the foundation of the abbey in the twelfth century.

The building has been considerably altered since it opened in 1840 and is clothed on all sides by later work. Nonetheless it is a notable building in the Reading streetscape for anyone arriving from the east by train and is a visible link to the once-great and rich Reading Abbey. It revived Catholic worship on an historic site where it had been suppressed three centuries before.

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Reading - St William of York

Modest church built to meet the needs of Catholics in the southern and eastern suburbs of Reading. It was built economically and was never completed to the original plans. These were by Father (later Canon) Alexander Joseph Cory Scoles. Scoles (1844-1920) was one of two architect-priest sons of J.J. Scoles, eminent Gothic Revival architect and receiver of a number of important Catholic commissions, particularly for the Jesuits. He was a Franciscan Tertiary and before coming to Portsmouth diocese was for twenty-three years in the diocese of Clifton, where he designed and built churches at Bridgwater, Trowbridge and Yeovil as well as the Carmelite church and Priory at Wincanton.

After falling out with the Bishop of Clifton, Scoles moved to Portsmouth diocese, where St Francis, Ascot (1888-9) was his first church. He went on to build St Swithun, and St Joseph, both in Portsmouth (1901 and 1914 respectively) and also worked on the west end of the Cathedral. His last and best work was the Church of the Holy Ghost, Basingstoke.

The extension in 1969, although no doubt much needed, was also frugal. Due to the unfulfilled original plans and the functional extension, the building is of limited architectural importance.

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Ringwood - Sacred Heart and St Therese of Lisieux

The church is of some architectural interest as a functionalist interpretation of a traditional church form, with no extraneous ornament. The severely stripped, elemental design perhaps shows the influence of F.X. Velarde’s contemporary church of St Monica at Bootle (1936), but also bears comparison with functional industrial designs of the pre-war years. The church was completed in a reduced form after 1945; the original design was for a larger building, with a small west tower.

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Romsey - St Joseph

This, the sisters’ chapel of La Sagesse Convent, is at the heart of a large complex of Catholic buildings. It is a very distinctive and attractive building which is a well-crafted amalgam of Romanesque, Byzantine, Arts & Crafts and touches of vernacular revival.

This is an early work by Wilfrid C. Mangan of Preston who worked extensively in Portsmouth diocese. He much favoured round-arched architecture and went on to use it at St Saviour, Totland Bay (1923), the English Martyrs, Reading (1926), and St Joseph, Newbury (1926-8).

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Ryde - St Mary

A ‘rogue’ Gothic design of great strength and personality. The church is important as an early yet accomplished work of great personality by the young J.A. Hansom, executed to a high quality and at great expense. With the two eighteenth century Catholic churches on the Isle of Wight, St Mary’s is important in the revival of Catholicism on the Island. It was paid for entirely by the Catholic convert, Elizabeth Countess of Clare, at a time when the restoration of Catholicism in England was still highly controversial.

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Sacred Heart - St Brelade

Although not adventurous or ground-breaking in its design or layout, this is a solid, pleasingly rugged and well-crafted granite church in thirteenth century Gothic style. It might be regarded as a symbol of the Island’s post-war liberation (incorporating in its design a subtle snub to the Occupiers). The church has high townscape value.  

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Samares - St Patrick

Post-war church of limited architectural interest, but containing some furnishings of high quality.

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Sandown - St Patrick

Church by W.C. Mangan, unusual in being closely modelled on the important Irish Arts & Crafts chapel at Honan, Cork. It is not an exact copy, is executed with lavishness and great attention to detail and is a valuable work of art in its own right. High quality stained glass by the studio of one of the most important Irish stained glass artists of the twentieth century.

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Seaview - Holy Cross

Holy Cross is a modest 1950s church, not unattractive and with a devotional atmosphere inside. It is not of any importance architecturally.

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Shanklin - Sacred Heart

The church is a good example of a small 1950s church building of some character and distinctive design. It is the work of a local architect about whom little is known. The firm’s most celebrated work, Chert, a private house in Ventnor, is thought to be largely the design of the clients. 

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