Southampton - St Patrick

W.C. Mangan’s last church in the diocese, with a moderne Gothic character rather than the basilican style he favoured elsewhere. The design is not without character and is in the mainstream of brick church building around middle of the twentieth century.

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Southampton - Christ the King

A distinctive design and one of the more significant churches of the post-war rebuilding of Southampton. The bell tower in particular is a striking local landmark and it is regrettable that the cost of repairs may lead to its demolition. The interior is  mix of contemporary and traditional fittings and furnishings.

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Southampton - Holy Family

Liam McCormick was architect for many post-war churches in Ireland; In The Buildings of Ireland: North West Ulster he is described as ‘the doyen of Ulster church builders’. His design for Holy Family, achieved in close collaboration with Father McDonald (who commissioned the building), is his only church in England. A well composed and balanced exterior with a carefully thought out interior, informed by the emerging liturgical reforms of the Second Vatican Council. The relative austerity of the interior with all emphasis on the altar is balanced by the use of warm natural materials (avoiding the need for painting) and the luscious colours of the stained glass. Good original fittings. Minor changes in the sanctuary have to some extent compromised the architect’s intentions.

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Southampton - Immaculate Conception

A 1950s brick church of conventional form and in the stripped down Gothic that remained commonplace for church building. W.H. Saunders & Son were a big commercial practice in the 1950s and 60s, Gosport Town Hall of 1964 being one of their more important commissions.

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Southampton - St Boniface

Church designed by the Preston-based architect, Wilfrid Clarence Mangan, who worked extensively in Portsmouth diocese. Mangan was an enthusiast for round-arched, predominantly Byzantine, styles which were highly popular for Catholic churches between the wars. Extravagant brick detailing is often a feature of these churches. Other such work by him in the diocese is to be found at St Joseph, Romsey (1913), the convent church of the Sacred Heart, Waterlooville (1922-5), St Saviour, Totland Bay (1923), St Theresa of the Child Jesus, Totton (1925), English Martyrs Reading (1926), St Joseph, Newbury (1926-8) St Patrick, Sandown (1928-9) and St Patrick, Southampton (1939). His output varies in style and quality. St Boniface is a work of considerable originality in its detailing and its Byzantine style is most attractive and unexpected in a 1920s suburban high street.

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Southampton - St Edmund

A good later Victorian town church of lofty proportions and well detailed, with high quality fittings. J. William Lunn is an obscure Victorian architect but his few known churches are all of some character and quality.

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Southampton - St Joseph

Located in the heart of the old town, St Joseph’s is important as the first and mother Catholic Church of Southampton. 

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St Helier, Jersey - St Thomas

The principal Catholic church in Jersey, and one of the finest in the diocese. Built of Brittany granite in the French Gothic style of the thirteenth century, by a French architect for the Oblates of Mary Immaculate. The church is a major St Helier landmark and the lofty interior is vaulted throughout. The church was subjected to a major and destructive reordering after the Second Vatican Council, but retains glass and other furnishings of considerable interest. It has recently (2006-07) been the subject of an extensive and sympathetic renovation.

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St Martin - Our Lady of the Annunciation and the Martyrs of Japan

The oldest surviving purpose-built Catholic church on the Island. Granite-built structure of 1863, in thirteenth century Gothic style, with a charming plaster vaulted interior. Contains French stained glass windows and a number of artefacts of interest.  

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St Peter - St Matthew

Imposing granite church of 1872, in French thirteenth century Gothic style by Frangeul, architect of St Thomas’ church, St Helier. Handsome vaulted interior, with west tribune gallery. The church forms the centrepiece of an important group of historic buildings, built to serve the needs of the scattered population of French Catholics on the west side of the Island.

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St Peter Port - Notre Dame du Rosaire

Post-War church with a distinctive roofline, tower and spire and some good furnishings, occupying a prominent and historic site of Catholic worship in St Peter Port’s central conservation area.

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St Peter Port - St Joseph and St Mary

The Church of St Joseph and St Mary is one of Guernsey’s most architecturally and historically important churches, and the only church in the Channel Islands by the principal proponent and practitioner of the Gothic revival, A.W.N. Pugin. The exterior is an impressive and thoroughgoing essay in the Decorated Gothic style. The spire was added later, to the designs of Peter Paul Pugin. The interior decoration has been subject to substantial change but some fine detailing survives, including large parts of the painted timber ceiling.

The modern school building is of little architectural interest, but the parish rooms (originally the secondary school) is a fine late-nineteenth or early-twentieth century building faced in stone.

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St Sampson - Our Lady Star of the Sea

The church is a simple but attractive and well-built late nineteenth century Gothic church. Together with the former school, its granite and cream-painted exterior forms a distinctive group, and the small scale of both buildings provide a vernacular flavour. There is an interesting historical link between the birth of the church and parish, and the influx of Irish workers in the wake of the potato famine. 

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St Thomas More - North Hinksey

This is a simple but attractive converted garage in the garden of a fine Edwardian house. Its primary interest lies in the furnishings it contains from Eric Gill’s chapel at Piggotts.

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St Thomas of Canterbury - Cowes

Late-eighteenth century church and attached presbytery, built by the Rev Thomas Gabb and paid for by Elizabeth Heneage. The church is of great historical importance as an early Catholic parish church, being built just five years after the second Catholic Relief Act. Architecturally the building is a good but not exceptional example of a Georgian chapel; it was altered in the mid-Victorian period. The interior is notable for its superb original reredos enclosing an altarpiece.

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Tadley - SS Peter and Paul

The church occupies a former village hall. It is designed in the Queen Anne style much favoured in the late 1880s, of red brick with stone dressings. Its exterior has been subjected to various unsympathetic alterations, but the building nevertheless makes a positive contribution to the conservation area in which it is located. The site is identified in the Council’s Conservation Area Appraisal as part of an Area of High Archaeological Potential.

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Tadley - St Michael

This is a functional building of the late 1950s with some sociological interest in reflecting the influx of Irish construction workers to Aldermaston at that time.

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Totland Bay - St Saviour

Church designed by the Preston-based architect, Wilfrid C. Mangan, who worked extensively in Portsmouth diocese. In this case he was working with his father James. W. C. Mangan was an enthusiast for round-arched styles which were highly popular for Catholic churches between the wars. Other such work by him in the diocese is to be found at St Joseph, Romsey (1913), the convent church of the Sacred Heart, Waterlooville (1922-5), English Martyrs Reading (1926), and St Joseph, Newbury (1926-8). Their output varies in style and quality. St Saviour’s, Totland Bay, is a work of considerable originality in its detailing and its Italian Romanesque style is most attractive and unexpected in this context.

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Totton - St Theresa

A modest building, quite striking in the local context, with an Italian flavour. The architect was W.C. Mangan, a prolific Roman Catholic church architect of the inter-war and post-war years, and his church at Totton was clearly built to a modest budget and has been considerably, though sensitively, altered. Not of special interest but important for its contribution to local townscape and history.

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Ventnor - Our Lady and St Wilfrid

A fairly conventional mid-Victorian church, though not without merit. Such special interest as it had has been greatly eroded by a major fire in late 2006.

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