Manchester - St Chad

The successor church to a chapel of 1776, the oldest post-Reformation Catholic mission in Manchester. The present church is an interesting example of church architecture of the 1840s by Weightman & Hadfield, illustrating the development of ecclesiastical architecture generally during this period and the work of these architects in particular. The church has a good interior with interesting fixtures, fittings and stained glass, including a window of 1847 by Barnett of York. The church and presbytery form a good group in the local townscape.

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Manchester - St Cuthbert

The west end and nave were built to the designs of the noted Catholic architectural practice Goldie & Child in striking Romanesque/Byzantine style. It is possible that the design of the church influenced the then Bishop of Salford, Herbert Vaughan, in his later choice of Byzantine for the style of Westminster Cathedral.  Additions of 1901-2 by W.T. Gunson & Son are in keeping and almost seamless. The church has lost detail during reordering but retains a fine, impressive interior with monumental volumes. With the presbytery and parish hall, the church is part of a characterful group at the centre of the local conservation area.

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Manchester - St Edward

A church designed by E. W. Pugin which is largely unaltered outside, though without the projected spire, which was never built. The interior was reordered in the 1960s, with much loss of original furnishings, although the original structure, internal volumes and roof timbers are largely intact. There is some original and early stained glass in the chancel by Edmundson & Son of Manchester. The building illustrates the development of Pugin’s style and is one of a group of churches in the diocese built to his designs.

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Manchester - St Francis of Assisi

A modest and functional design of the 1990s, the successor to E. W. Pugin’s magnificent church and friary, which is now closed and in secular use. 

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Manchester - St Joseph

The church is an interesting example of early twentieth-century architectural design which exhibits the influence of Art Nouveau and Free Style trends. The exterior is very little altered.  Inside, details such as the design of the roof and the modelling of the arcades continues the Free Style approach. The interior has recently been renovated, with reinstatement of traditional furnishings.

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Manchester - St Kenigern

A modest, but simple and dignified interwar design by E. Bower Norris and F.M. Reynolds, local architects of some note.

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Manchester - St Mary (The Hidden Gem)

The second Catholic church to be founded in Manchester in modern times, after St Chad Rook Street. Known since the late nineteenth-century as ‘The Hidden Gem’, the present St Mary’s is of special architectural interest for its unusual style for the date, exhibiting Continental influence. The architects were Weightman & Hadfield, who undertook many Catholic commissions, including the Cathedral of St John in Salford. The church has a little-altered and characterful interior, with a spectacular display of reredoses and statuary from the 1870s. More recent furnishings include Stations of the Cross by Norman Adams RA. The presbytery was built or remodelled in the 1870s and is of good architectural quality.    

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Manchester - St Patrick

A building of monumental appearance, combining Art Deco and Romanesque motifs. The interior is highly impressive and the decorative scheme, which includes extensive mosaic work by Ludwig Oppenheimer, forms a rich and memorable ensemble. The church is part of a group, disparate architecturally, but functionally related, which includes the Presentation Convent.

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Manchester - St Richard

A modest design by E. Bower Norris & F. M. Reynolds. It contains furnishings from other churches in the area, including a good stained glass panel showing St Patrick.

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Middleton - Our Lady of the Assumption

A well-detailed and little-altered modern Romanesque design of the late 1950s, its tall campanile a local landmark.

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Middleton - St Agnes and St John Fisher

A modest building of the early 1960s, originally intended principally as a parish hall.  The simply fitted interior has been altered very little.

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Middleton - St Peter

A red brick and terracotta Gothic Revival church, possibly an early work by Harold Greenhalgh, built shortly before the First World War. The interior, with its stone nave arcades and richly furnished sanctuary, is more impressive than the exterior.

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Middleton - St Thomas More

A striking modern building dominated by a strong pattern of flat roof-planes stepping down from a tall tower behind the sanctuary.  The interior, designed for the post-Vatican II liturgy, has been little altered since its completion in 1972.

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Mossley - St Joseph

A modestly-sized and well-detailed design of the 1960s by Desmond Williams, in a simplified modern Gothic style, and built on the site of its 1860s predecessor. It has been little altered and retains some original fittings. The spirelet and distinctive main front give the church some local landmark presence.  

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Moston, Manchester - St Dunston

An ambitious interwar suburban church by Norris & Reynolds, of strong townscape presence. The interior is a large and dramatically-handled space, with good later furnishings, including mosaic work by the Ludwig Oppenheimer firm. 

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Moston, Manchester - St John Vianney

A modest building of 1991 with few architectural pretensions. 

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Nelson - Christ Church

A modern ecumenical church in the centre of Nelson, whose ownership is shared by Catholics and Methodists. It is the successor to St Joseph’s, the first Catholic mission in Nelson, whose third church was closed in 1992. The church is built of local materials, to blend with the conservation area. 

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Nelson - Holy Saviour

A plain Gothic Revival church, started in 1904-5 and extended to the east about fifty years later, in contrasting materials. The church retains few historic furnishings.

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Nelson - St John Southworth

A plain interwar combined school-chapel, replacing an earlier dual use building on the site. The mission and the church were originally dedicated to St George.

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New Moston, Manchester St Margaret Mary

One of several similar post-war churches in the area designed by the architects Greenhalgh & Williams. It is of fairly conventional design and is smaller and less ambitious than some of their other churches.

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