New Springs - Holy Family

Built in the late 1950s, and of limited architectural interest. Together with the earlier church/school, which is now used as a parish hall, it occupies a large site, and serves a small but loyal community of worshippers. 

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Newchurch-in-Rossendale - St Peter

A plain interwar church built to a standard design used by the architect Richard Byrom elsewhere in the diocese. The church is the third building used by the mission, including a former Methodist church on the site of the current church. 

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Newton Heath - Christ the King

One of a number of churches of similar date in the Manchester area by Greenhalgh & Williams. The stained glass windows and fixtures brought from elsewhere in recent years include work of interest and quality, although they are somewhat incongruous in the setting of a 1950s church. 

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Oldham - Our Lady

A modest 1960s combined church and parish hall of portal frame construction. It is built on part of the site of the former Moorside House, home of the notable textile milling Mellodew family. 

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Oldham - Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St Patrick

A solid mid-Victorian Gothic Revival church by a local architect which retains a good set of fittings from the 1870s and early twentieth century (including a high altar and reredos by George Goldie). The church was built to serve a largely Irish community.

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Oldham - Sacred Heart

A modest design by Reynolds & Scott, built to serve a growing part of the Oldham suburbs, its simplicity reflecting the austerity of the immediate post-war period. The church has some furnishings of note.

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Oldham - St Anne

A well-detailed and little-altered large urban church in modern Basilican Romanesque style by Harold Greenhalgh, a well-regarded local architect, and similar to his slightly later church of St Patrick, Collyhurst (qv). The exterior is austere, but the interior has strong character, with an intact set of good quality fittings.  

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Oldham - St Mary

The earliest Catholic church in Oldham, built in 1839 and an early design by M. E. Hadfield. Some of this early church survives, greatly overlaid and extended later in the nineteenth century. Furnishings of note include a fine 1920s Gothic high altar and reredos by Ferdinand Stuflesser. The attached presbytery dates from 1839 but has been much altered.

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Oldham - St Michael

A typical example of the many economically-designed and built churches-cum-parish halls built on housing estates in the post-war years. The added brick porch has not enhanced the already modest architectural character of the building.

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Osbaldeston - St Mary

A well-detailed Perpendicular Gothic design of the 1830s, with attached Tudor-style presbytery. The interior shows the persistence of the pre-Puginian single-volume galleried arrangement. The most notable of the furnishings is the reredos of the 1850s. The church, presbytery and adjacent school form a good historic group of stone buildings in a prominent position on Longsight Road.  

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Oswaldtwistle - St Mary

A Gothic Revival church of 1897-8, with major alterations and extensions of 1928, designed in a contextual manner. Church and presbytery make a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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OuHaslingden - r Lady of Immaculate Conception

A small Early English Gothic Revival church built to serve the largely Irish population of the cotton mill town of Haslingden. The design is very similar to that for St Mary, Bacup (qv), and is probably by the same architect. The church is associated with the Irish nationalist Michael Davitt, who lived and worked in Haslingden. The former school buildings to the rear of the church are now used by a flourishing community centre.

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Padiham - St John the Baptist

A large Gothic Revival church of 1880-1 by Edward Simpson, doubled in length in the 1930s. It has panelling from three former cruise liners. The main feature of the sanctuary is a large Calvary scene. Adjacent to the church are the former school-chapel by E. W. Pugin and the presbytery, both of the 1860s.

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Padiham - St Philip the Apostle

A conventional post-war design by a local surveyor, with some unusual details.

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Pendlebury - St Mark

A modest interwar building in traditional style. 

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Prestwich - Our Lady of Grace

A late example of a full-blooded Gothic Revival church, built in 1930-1 from designs by H. Greenhalgh. The interior is elaborately fitted and decorated and almost all the furnishings are original or early.

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Radcliffe - St Mary and St Philip Neri

A simple modern (2009) church and parish centre designed by an architectural practice with longstanding links to the diocese.

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Ramsbottom - St Joseph

A simply detailed but well handled church of 1880 in early Gothic style designed by a little-known Manchester architect on a difficult and sloping site. Both the church and the adjacent earlier presbytery make a positive contribution to the character of the Ramsbottom Conservation Area.

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Ribchester - Ss Peter amd Paul

The oldest church in the diocese, built before the Second Catholic Relief Act, and passing itself off as the pavilion wing of a small country villa. The church was extended at the (ritual) west end in 1877. The interior is plain, with a gallery at the west end; there are few furnishings of note and the building has suffered from some inappropriate alterations. 

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Rishton - St Charles Borromeo

A large interwar Gothic church, built alongside the presbytery and school-chapel of 1896. It belongs to the partnership (c1936-46) of E. Bower Norris and Francis Reynolds, which produced the now listed churches of St Dunstan, Moston and St Willibrord, Clayton (qqv). Four stained glass windows of the 1890s by Mayer & Co of Munich were transferred from the previous church. The church is a local landmark.

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