Ribchester - Ss Peter amd Paul

The oldest church in the diocese, built before the Second Catholic Relief Act, and passing itself off as the pavilion wing of a small country villa. The church was extended at the (ritual) west end in 1877. The interior is plain, with a gallery at the west end; there are few furnishings of note and the building has suffered from some inappropriate alterations. 

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Rishton - St Charles Borromeo

A large interwar Gothic church, built alongside the presbytery and school-chapel of 1896. It belongs to the partnership (c1936-46) of E. Bower Norris and Francis Reynolds, which produced the now listed churches of St Dunstan, Moston and St Willibrord, Clayton (qqv). Four stained glass windows of the 1890s by Mayer & Co of Munich were transferred from the previous church. The church is a local landmark.

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Rochdale - Holy Family

A simple post-war church with an Italianate tower, concrete frame and red brick facings. The building is well-sited on a prominent rise in the centre of this post-war housing estate.

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Rochdale - Sacred Heart

The church was economically built in the mid-1950s and is typical of that period in the use of tall portal frames for the main structure, in timber rather than the more usual concrete. While it is both functional and attractive internally, the exterior has lost some of its architectural presence by the removal of the campanile.

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Rochdale - St John the Baptist

A substantial town centre landmark church of Byzantine design, strongly influenced by Bentley’s Westminster Cathedral.  The church was designed by Henry Oswald Hill of Manchester before 1917 but was not built until the 1920s, under the direction of E. Bower Norris. The intended campanile was never built, although in some views the 1930s drill tower of the nearby fire station groups with the church to fulfil a similar function in townscape terms. The vaulted interior has a concrete dome and is enhanced by fine 1930s mosaic decoration in the sanctuary by Eric Newton.

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Rochdale - St Patrick

A striking and effective design from the early 1960s by Desmond Williams & Associates. The robust interior is well-lit and serves its purpose effectively, but the church does not contain furnishings and artworks of particular note.

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Rochdale - St Vincent de Paul

A clear functional design of the 1970s, designed to place all the internal focus on the top-lit altar, which beneath its modern cladding incorporates a pre-Reformation altar stone. The external appearance of the church is slightly forbidding but the interior is enhanced by vibrant slab glass.

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Royton - St Aidan and St Oswald

An imposing 1960s church of modern design, considerably altered both inside and out. 

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Sabden - St Mary

A modest but neat stone-built structure of 1937, adjoining a mid-nineteenth century house, and making a small but positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Sacred Heart - Manchester

A design by the Reynolds & Scott partnership, moving into a slightly more ‘Gothic’ phase, with a striking west end entrance bay.  The interior is dominated by the exposed concrete frame, and retains some original furnishings and more recent stained glass.

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Salford - Cathedral Church of St John the Evangelist

The cathedral church of the Diocese of Salford, and one of a small group of large, architecturally ambitious Catholic churches built in England before 1850 which reflected the growing confidence and ambition of the Church. It is a powerful design and forms a good group with the attached former offices and seminary buildings. The interior has strong spatial qualities and retains interesting and unusual stained glass and some furnishings of high quality. 

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Salford - Mother of God and St James

The church adopts a striking and simple design and is cleverly lit inside by clerestory and strip windows. It incorporates furnishings from the predecessor church and from a closed church at Weaste.

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Salford - Our Lady of Dolours

A building in a stripped Basilican Romanesque style, of unassuming external appearance but with a handsome interior. The church was built for the Order of Friar Servants of Mary (Servites), and is a very conservative design for its date, but well-detailed.

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Salford - St Joseph

A building of some presence in the local area, retaining some architectural character despite partial rebuilding after the Second World War. The internal volumes are largely preserved.

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Salford - St Luke

An interesting and fairly well preserved example from the first generation of churches built to accommodate the liturgical recommendations of the Second Vatican Council. The external appearance has been changed with the replacement of the copper roof, but apart from fairly minor reordering it is largely intact, with some good furnishings, including later Stations of the Cross and other art works by Harold Riley.

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Salford - St Sebastian

A fairly simple, well designed building, slotted into a site which retains older buildings of local historical interest. The most significant fittings are the organ and the Sacred Heart sculpture from the previous church; the paintings are also of local interest. 

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Salford - St Thomas of Canterbury

The church was built at the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and is of some architectural quality, with a spacious interior. It retains some good quality furnishings, such as the reredos and stained glass.

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Samlesbury - St Mary and St John

A simple and evocative chapel and attached presbytery, typical of those built in the Northern District between the Catholic Relief Act of 1790 and the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829. The mission has important historical associations with the Southworth and other local Catholic families. The church enjoys an idyllic setting, somewhat marred by the proximity of the motorway.   

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Shaw - St Joseph

A modest design of the 1980s, replacing and incorporating furnishings from the predecessor church of 1896. The most notable new furnishings are the windows by Dom Charles Norris of Buckfast Abbey. 

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St Malachy - Manchester

A typical church design of the 1970s, with a roof funnel and clerestory lighting. The exterior has some presence, despite its small size, and the interior is welcoming and well lit.

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