Stockport - St Joseph

A late nineteenth century design by Herbert Tijou, transformed by a fairly imaginative remodelling by Reynolds & Scott in the early 1960s. Old and new elements work well together and there is stained glass of some quality from the original building. 

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Stockport - St Mary

St Mary’s was designed by Pugin & Pugin and exhibits an obvious debt to the architecture of E. W. Pugin. The church dates from the close of the nineteenth century and the exterior retains architectural coherence, despite some alteration. Inside there have been changes and reordering, however a rich effect still obtains and the church has a good collection of stained glass. The church is a key historic building and landmark in the conservation area.

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Stockport - St Winifrid

A building of relatively simple yet monumental design recalling Art Deco-inspired architecture of the interwar years. It is simply treated inside and the exterior incorporates a good modern carved figure of Christ. 

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Stonyhurst - St Peter

A major work of the Gothic Revival, entering its ‘archaeological’ phase. The building is an expression of Catholic confidence in the post-Emancipation years, and of the Jesuits who built it. The church of St Peter is of outstanding significance for its historical associations with Stonyhurst School, for its external architecture and for the quality of its interior and fittings.

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Stretford - St Anne

An interesting and important design by E. W. Pugin, deploying favoured motifs to impressive effect. The church was built by the Catholic de Trafford family of Trafford Hall, which stood nearby. Its design is related to that of nearby All Saints, Barton-upon -Irwell (now owned by the Franciscans), widely regarded as Pugin’s masterwork and likewise the result of de Trafford patronage. Pugin also designed the presbytery.

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Stretford - St Hugh of Lincoln

A good example of an innovative church design of about the time of the Second Vatican Council, on a fan-shaped plan and retaining much of its original character. The most striking feature is the dalle-de-verre glass in full-height panels in the nave and baptistery, an ambitious scheme by the Buckfast Abbey studio. The sanctuary has been reordered.

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Swinton - St Charles

A modest church of mid-twentieth century date without strong architectural pretensions.

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Swinton - St Mary of the Immaculate Conception

An ambitious design built about the time of the Second Vatican Council, with an unusual arrangement of double naves focussing on the sanctuary. Although there have been radical alterations since that time, some of the original character survives. 

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Todmorden - St Joseph

A large and plain stone-built interwar church, built in the garden of West Lodge, a villa of 1834, which is now used as the presbytery. The house and the church make a positive contribution to the local conservation area.

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Tottington - St Hilda

A simple and economical church of the 1960s built from designs by Arthur Farebrother & Partners using the Lanner system of construction.

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Urmston - Our Lady and the English Martyrs

A striking building of some architectural quality in a neo-Romanesque idiom. It makes a positive contribution to the appearance of this part of Urmston. The interior is simple and dignified, with good proportions. 

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Walkden - Christ the King

A striking but nonetheless mainstream design of the early 1960s (i.e. before the Second Vatican Council) with longitudinal plan, reinforced concrete frame and off-centre bell tower. The church has a calm, dignified and well-lit interior.

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Walton-le-Dale - Our Lady and St Patrick

A substantial stone-built church in fourteenth century Gothic style, and an early design by Peter Paul Pugin, built for a parish long served by the Douai Benedictines. The church has recently undergone major reordering, retaining the three stone altars and other historic features. With its adjoining presbytery, war memorial, school and burial ground the church holdings form a prominent group in the local street scene. 

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Westhoughton - Sacred Heart

The church was purpose-designed for the parish by Pozzoni Design Group and built in 1994-5. Although not of special architectural or historical interest, it is well-liked and provides an attractive setting for worship, with good facilities housed within a practical building.

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Whalley - English Martyr

A modest structure, built as a temporary church-hall in 1926. The intention was to build a church in the west range of Whalley Abbey which, along with a former farmhouse (now the presbytery), had been acquired by the Diocese of Salford in the 1920s. The church is not a building of special architectural interest, but occupies a site of high architectural, historical, archaeological and townscape significance. 

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Whitefield - St Bernadette

The Manchester architects Reynolds & Scott designed a large number of well detailed churches with simple, vaguely Romanesque, exteriors and interiors enhanced by the play of round arches. St Bernadette’s, built in the mid 1950s, is typical of their work.

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Whitefield- St Michael

A modern (2000) functional design, housing a church and parish hall under one roof.

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Whitworth - St Anselm

A plain church designed by the first mission priest, Fr John Anselm Milward, and built using voluntary labour. A clock tower and side chapels were later added. The church is flanked by the presbytery and the primary school. The church is of interest on account of the circumstances of its construction, and for its townscape value.

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