Blackley, Manchester - Our Lady of Mount Carmel

An imposing building on a prominent corner site, by a little-known local architect, who built elsewhere in the diocese. The interior volume is impressive, and the church has a good, sensitively reordered furnishing scheme. The attached presbytery is also a building with some presence. Together the buildings form a good group historically associated with a mission established before the transformation of the area by council housing estates. 

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Blackley, Manchester - St John Bosco

The church is typical of those in the area designed by Greenhalgh & Williams during the 1950s. This example is more successful than many of the others with a striking and simple interior and unfussy Italianate style exterior. 

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Bolton - St Brednan

A simple modern church of traditional character, designed by Greenhalgh & Williams and built in 1974-5. Although it is of limited architectural interest, its light-filled, calm and well-ordered interior is valued by the worshipping community, whose care for the building reflects their continued commitment to its future.

 

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Bolton - Ss Peter and Paul

The church occupies the site of the first Catholic place of worship in Bolton. It was built in 1897 to the design of Sinnott, Sinnott & Powell, and is a prominent building with a tall tower and a large presbytery, which forms part of the overall composition. Apart from the tower and the porch, the exterior of the church is plain and austere, faced in harsh red brick and without ornamentation. The interior has an impressive grandeur, with a tall nave, arcades of granite columns, and a sanctuary with monumental Gothic reredos. The detail, however, is heavy and mechanical, and the design is conservative for its date. The most interesting feature is the Lady Chapel, which was remodelled in the 1920s as a War Memorial, and further embellished in 1933.

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Bolton - St Edmund

One of the earliest surviving churches in the Bolton Deanery and an interesting and now relatively rare example of the modest church/school buildings that were built in large number to serve poor, often Irish communities in the growing industrial towns of the diocese. It is a simple building that retains its original form, and while the population has moved away from the area in which it stands, it still maintains a loyal and committed congregation.

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Bolton - St Ethelbert

A simple but well appointed building of 1958-9 in Romanesque style, with a tall campanile. The church has a calm interior with arcaded side aisles and a timber coffered ceiling.

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Bolton - St James the Great

A simple building which started life in 1954 as a school. Although it has no special architectural interest, it has been sensitively adapted and works well as a place of worship. The Halliwell Cross is a reminder of Bolton’s Catholic history and a feature of local interest. 

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Bolton - St Joseph

The church was built in 1898-1900 in a densely built-up area of industry and workers’ housing. It occupies a corner site and forms part of a tightly composed group with the slightly earlier parish centre and presbytery. The church, which remains largely unaltered, is of local interest, and makes a contribution to the character of the area.  

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Bolton - St Osmund

Dating from 1960-61 and one of a number of churches built in the Bolton Deanery to serve the expanding suburbs of the post-war period. As with others designed by Geoffrey Williams of the prolific Greenhalgh & Williams practice, it has an inventive spirit and hidden qualities. The exterior is simple and somewhat toy-like in character, but the interior is distinguished by a strong sense of space, and by high quality furnishings in marble and timber. The recent colour scheme, which is quite different to that intended by the architect, successfully complements the individual character of the building.   

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Bolton - St Patrick

Although small in scale, the church of St Patrick is a landmark within the area. It dates from 1861, and with its corner spire it was more architecturally ambitious than other Catholic churches built in the town around this time. The church and presbytery, together with the boundary wall to Great Moor Street, form an attractive group, even though the Gothic treatment of the presbytery is only skin deep. Built to serve a largely Irish community who escaped the misery of the potato famine and sought jobs in the textile mills, the church has a reputation as a great spiritual centre for Bolton.

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Bolton - St Thomas of Canterbury

A large church designed by Greenhalgh & Williams and built in 1956-8. The sloping site was used to advantage by providing a church with a ground floor parish room set below the west end of the nave. The architects used their trademark portal frame structure, encased in brick and designed in a stripped-down Romanesque style. A calm building, both externally and internally, it lacks the more distinctive features of their best ecclesiastical work.

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Bolton - St Vincent de Paul

A modest design of the 1980s, not of special architectural interest. It has undergone few changes since it was built, and with the adjoining parish hall continues to serve the parish well.

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Bolton - St William of York

A sizeable church designed by Greenhalgh & Williams and built in 1953-4. The architects used their trademark portal frame structure, encased in brick and designed in a stripped-down Romanesque style, with a tower and transepts providing a distinctive roofline within what is otherwise a uniform post-war residential area. The interior is calm and simple, and provides a dignified setting for worship.

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Bolton - The Holy Infant and St Anthony

An attractive small church in a late Victorian Gothic style. The interior with its hammerbeam roof is unexpectedly grand, and is complemented by original carved timber furnishings and 1960s semi-abstract stained glass in vibrant colours.

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Bradford - St Brigid

A modest post-Vatican II church with an attractive exterior mosaic and interior furnishings from closed or demolished churches in the area.

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Bromley Cross - St John the Evangelist

An interesting modern design of 1966-7, reflecting the new liturgy of the Second Vatican Council. The centralised high altar and sanctuary with seating on all four sides, is expressed in the external form of the church with its tall central spire and clerestory glazing. The church has good quality original furnishings, and the stained glass by Dom Charles Norris of Buckfast Abbey and sculptures by Ray Schofield enhance its artistic interest.  

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Burnley - Christ the King

A plain interwar church, intended as the church hall for a projected church (unexecuted). It was built in the garden behind Spring Hill, a Georgian mill owner’s villa which temporarily served as the chapel and then as presbytery, until its sale by the diocese.

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Burnley - St Augustine

A plain post-war church which was built in the shadow of two cotton mills (now demolished). The predecessor building, a combined school-chapel of 1897-8, is still in use by the parish primary school. 

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Burnley - St John the Baptist

An urban Gothic Revival church constructed on a site beside a cotton mill. The benefactress was Lady O’Hagan, the heiress of Towneley Hall. The church’s predecessor building, a school-chapel, still survives, as does the original high altar from that chapel (now in a side chapel in the church).

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Burnley - St Mary Magdalene

A modern church built after the predecessor building of 1904 had to be demolished for the M65. It has several furnishings from the old church, including a fine carved reredos of c.1938 of Austrian oak. The compensation from the Highways Authority also paid for a second church: St Teresa’s church (qv), of nearly identical design.

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