Burnley - St Mary of the Assumption

A large urban Puginian Gothic Revival church of 1846-49, with strong connections with the Catholic Towneley family. The church was the successor to a chapel built in c.1817, which in turn had replaced the chapel at Towneley Hall. The current church was built on a site owned by the Towneley family with stone from the family’s quarries, a Towneley chapel was furnished in 1879, and the family’s agent and shorthorn keeper paid for a high altar and reredos (by E.W. Pugin; largely destroyed). Despite the unfinished tower and spire, the church and adjacent convent building have a strong townscape presence.

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Burnley - St Teresa of the Infant Jesus

A modern chapel-of-ease which, like St Mary Magdalene, Burnley (qv), was built when the old St Mary Magdalene’s church had to be demolished for the M65. Both new churches are by the same architects and use the same basic design. The church has two segments of the altar rails from the old church, as well as a font from an Anglican church also demolished for the motorway.

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Bury - Our Lady of Good Counsel and Guardian Angels

A straightforward church design by Richard Byrom, typical of its date in its vaguely Romanesque styling.  The interior has been little altered apart from the reordering of the sanctuary, and is barely distinguishable from the same architect’s church at Littleborough (qv), built over twenty five years previously.

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Bury - St Joseph

A typical example of a modest urban church of the 1870s with its simple red brick and stone Gothic styling and its elaborate timber roof structure. The 1950s fore-building detracts from this original character but the minor additions and alterations to the interior have been generally sympathetic.

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Bury - St Marie

A Perpendicular Gothic design of the 1840s by the short-lived architect John Harper, who was based in York; the lantern tower of St Helen’s church in that city is a clear influence, but Harper’s lantern is larger and grander, and a prominent element in the townscape. Inside, there is a spacious, aisleless nave, with large east and west windows. The interior is much altered and the furnishings are of lesser interest, although there is stained glass of note, by Wailes and others.

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Cadishead - Sacred Heart

A little-altered example of a mid-twentieth century church, and probably the first commission to be completed by Desmond Williams’s own practice. The use of bold geometrical forms combined with more traditional motifs, such as the pointed windows, is typical of the date. 

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Chadderton - St Herbert

A post-war suburban church by Reynolds & Scott, the longitudinal plan, broad west tower, careful detailing and use of a simplified modern Romanesque style all characteristic of their work. Notable furnishings include a timber baldacchino and flanking mosaics.

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Chipping - St Mary

A handsome stone-built Classical chapel with attached priest’s house, built by the Weld family shortly before Catholic Emancipation in 1829. A school building was built at the same time. The interior is of the Georgian galleried character popular for Catholic churches before the Puginian reaction, but the design and fitting out of the sanctuary is unusually rich. Church, presbytery, school (now parish hall) and burial ground form a particularly attractive group within the Chipping Conservation Area.

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Clayton - St Willibrord

A fine church of unusual design which exhibits strong character in the external massing and internal volumes. The interior incorporates extensive mosaic work by the Ludwig Oppenheimer firm.

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Clayton-le-Moors - St Mary

A post-war church built to replace a small chapel of 1819, which itself was the successor to a chapel in Dunkenhalgh House. Only the graveyard remains on the site of the old chapel. The historic holy water stoups were given to the church in 1997. The current church with its bell tower has strong townscape value. 

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Colne - Sacred Heart

A Gothic Revival church by Edward Simpson of Bradford. A presbytery, a school and a sanctuary extension were added slightly later. Another later addition was the hall under the church, which initially caused structural problems. The church has good furnishings, notably a rich mosaic scheme of the 1930s.

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Crumpsall, Manchester - St Anne

One of several similar portal-framed post-war churches in the area designed by the Manchester architects Greenhalgh & Williams. It has some character and is externally little altered, forming a local landmark.

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Darwen - Sacred Heart and St Edward

A simple Early English Gothic design of the 1880s, much altered in the early 1960s. The white marble war memorial is noteworthy.

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Darwen - St Joseph

A lively design in Decorated Gothic by Pugin & Pugin, making the most of a prominent corner site. The tall rocket-like northwest turret is characteristic of the architects’ work. The interior contains some good original detail, and fine marble and mosaic work of the 1930s in the sanctuary.

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Denton - Holy Family

A functional design, built to serve an area of post-war housing.  

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Denton - St Mary (Our Lady of Sorrows)

A striking design, reflecting the emerging liturgical ideas of the Second Vatican Council. The building has dramatic roof forms inside and out, with notable original furnishings including dalle-de-verre glass by Carl Edwards of Whitefriars.

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Droylsden - St Stephen

One of a number of similar churches in the area designed by Greenhalgh & Williams during the 1950s. It is a little more elaborate than some of the other examples, with distinctive glazing detail. The west tower is something of a local landmark.

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Dunsop Bridge - St Hubert

A small chapel in Early English style by Pugin and Murray, built by the Towneley family, apparently on the proceeds of racehorse winnings.  The building is little altered, and has a richly polychrome sanctuary with marble and granite altar, encaustic tile floor, painted and stencil wall decoration and stained glass by J. B. Capronnier. The churchyard has a notable Towneley memorial, and is the burial place of a Bishop of Nottingham. This is the northernmost church in the Diocese of Salford, in an idyllic rural setting at the entrance to the Trough of Bowland.

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Eccles - Holy Cross

An early 1960s church with interesting original glass, carvings and mural painting. The church is of striking appearance, forming a local landmark. Although the building design is conventional in some respects, the building and its artworks represent a worthwhile ensemble of strong local interest.

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Eccles - St Gilbert

A modest and fairly conventional design of the 1950s, built to serve a new housing estate. The church was closed in 2010. 

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