Eccles - St Mary

Built through the patronage of the de Trafford family to designs by W. H. Rawle, and a building of some presence and architectural character, with a little-altered exterior. An intended tower and spire were never built. The interior has been somewhat damagingly reordered, but the volumes are impressive and the building retains some original furnishings and a good scheme of stained glass by Mayer of Munich. 

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Eccles - St Matthew

A lightweight prefabricated building of the 1950s, so designed on account of fear of mining subsidence. The building is well-lit and in remarkably good condition for its date and type, but not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Failsworth - Immaculate Conception

A church of the early 1960s, built before the Second Vatican Council on a traditional basilican plan. The design is striking and unusual, with an interesting combination of Gothic, classical and modern architectural motifs. The architect, Tadeusz Lesisz of Greenhalgh & Williams, is a little known figure but a designer of some interest. The church exhibits a scheme of sculpture, stained glass and mosaic on Marian themes, mainly by local designers, and retains almost all of the original furnishings and fittings in little altered state. It also retains furnishings from the late-nineteenth-century predecessor church. 

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Farnworth - Our Lady of Lourdes

A distinctive church with a tall tower and an unusual plan form, set in a twentieth century residential district. It has a calm and friendly interior, with interesting features including the window walls of lozenge-shaped coloured glass panes that flank the sanctuary and the original timber furnishings. The building is one of the more progressive designs of the prolific mid twentieth-century church architects Greenhalgh and Williams, who were based in Bolton.    

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Farnworth - St Gregory the Great

An early (1873-75) work by Edmund Kirby, which although architecturally conservative contains an interesting interior with a distinctive timber roof and aisle arcades. When listed, the building contained a number of late nineteenth and early twentieth century fittings, though these have mostly been removed for safe keeping. The church has been closed for several years and in spite of considerable expenditure on maintenance is now in a serious state of disrepair.

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Flixton - St Monica

St Monica is an example of a 1960s church adopting a centralising plan with use of exposed laminated timber beams, which continue to characterise an unusual interior.

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Great Harwood - St Wulstan

An interwar brick church, built to replace an earlier tin church. The parish complex includes a bowling green, one of formerly three in this street in the nineteenth century.

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Haigh - Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

An attractive mid-nineteenth century church in a village setting on the edge of the Lancashire Plain. Its strong and simple Neo-Gothic design gives it a distinctive presence within the Haigh Conservation Area. Although it survives relatively unaltered from its original state, the unfinished sanctuary and its recent re-facing, as well as the demolition of the original presbytery, have reduced its coherence as an architectural ensemble, and the loss of furnishings has affected the quality of the interior.

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Haslingden - St Veronica

Helmshore House, an Italianate villa of the 1860s, was converted in the 1950s for use as a school and chapel, and later as a chapel and presbytery. Its poor condition led to its disuse five years ago. Since then, the adjacent parish hall has been used for church services. St Veronica’s is served from the church of the Immaculate Conception, Haslingden (qv).

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Haughton Green - St John Fisher

A design of the 1980s with a dignified well-lit interior, superseding a dual-purpose church and hall of the 1960s. The square plan with continuous clerestory and pyramidal roof was a form widely adopted for Catholic churches in the 1980s.  

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Heywood - Our Lady and St Paul

A church built to serve a post-war housing estate. The originally ambitious design was considerably simplified in execution and the present building is slightly forbidding in its austerity.

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Heywood - St Joseph

A brick Basilican Romanesque design of the early twentieth century by Oswald Hill, with an austerely handsome arched interior enhanced by rich decoration in the sanctuary and transepts.

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Higher Blackley, Manchester - St Clare

A striking example of post-war church design built for the Franciscans, combining original modern forms and references to historic ecclesiastical architecture. The church predates the Second Vatican Council, and is of traditional basilican plan. Apart from the original sanctuary arrangements, the interior is well preserved, with furnishings of note by Georg Mayer-Marton, Joseph Nuttgens, David John and others. 

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Higher Openshaw - St Anne

A striking church of some quality, and a local landmark. The west end is a simpler version of that of E. W. Pugin’s St Francis Gorton, possibly reflecting both churches’ common Franciscan history. The interior has been altered at various times, but retains much of its original character

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Hollinwood - Holy Family

A typical example of a post-war church built to serve a growing residential suburb; it retains some attractive ‘Festival of Britain’ features and fittings.

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Hollinwood - Holy Rosary

A modest 1950s church built to serve a post-war estate, arranged conventionally.  The long and simple interior has some noteworthy fittings.  

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Hollinwoos - Corpus Christ

A well-detailed design, very conservative for its date, with an intact set of fittings. With the presbytery it forms an attractive group and has local heritage value.

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Horwich - St Mary

An imposing design of 1905-6, built for this burgeoning railway town by architects Randolph & Holt. The church is set back from the road, with the presbytery, which is a part of the original design, largely concealing the sanctuary. The north transept, also partly hidden, is marked by a bellcote on the gable end, and the grouping of elements gives it a picturesque appeal. The overall composition is in the manner of E. W. Pugin and his pupil Edmund Kirby, but has a general awkwardness of proportion and flatness of surface. Many of the furnishings are original to the church, although the elaborate altars and reredos by Ferdinand Stuflesser date from the mid-1930s.

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Huncoat - Our Lady's Chapel

A small functional chapel built in 1931 on the outskirts of Huncoat village. A west porch was added later; this has fine sculpture, probably from another church.

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Hurst Green - St Joseph

The chapel is a modest nineteenth century stone building of no particular architectural significance, but making a positive contribution to the Hurst Green Conservation Area. Its primary significance lies in its historical associations with St Joseph’s school, which traces its origins back to the seventeenth century. The chapel also contains some furnishings of outstanding significance: the altar and reredos from J. J. Scoles’s St Peter, Stonyhurst (qv), brought here when that church was reordered in 1893.

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