Albrighton - St Joseph

A functional building of the 1970s, not of special architectural or historic interest.

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Alderley Edge - St Pius X

A functional design by Reynolds & Scott. The (probably contemporary) reredos canopy is of some interest and artistic merit, but most other furnishings are of standard design.

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Alsager - St Gabriel

A modest building by F. X. Velarde, given interest and some distinction by individual touches such as the window mullion mouldings and the carved altar frontal. The interior has been somewhat marred by a suspended ceiling in the nave, but retains furnishings of note, probably by Herbert Tyson Smith.

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Altrincham - St Hugh and St John

A modern building of good functional design but without special architectural interest. A window by Doritie Kettlewell is of some artistic interest.

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Altrincham - St Vincent de Paul

A fine building designed by Edmund Kirby, incorporating Early English and Decorated motifs and Continental Gothic forms and displaying the architect’s trademark interest in texture and decorative brickwork. The interior is little altered and retains early twentieth century furnishings of note, including the high altar and side altars. The church makes a positive contribution to the Devisdale Conservation Area.

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Appleton - St Monica

A functional building of no architectural or historic interest, which started life as a parish hall. Plans for a separate church were not realised.

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Barnton - Our Lady of Fatima

A simple functional building of the 1950s, without special architectural interest.

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Bebington - St Luke the Physician

The parish of St Luke the Physician has no church, and operates from a 1930s semi-detached house where it has a day chapel for weekday Masses. Sunday Mass is said by arrangement at the nearby Methodist church and school premises.

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Birkenhead - Holy Cross

The last of F. X. Velarde’s churches to be built in his lifetime, and said to have been his personal favourite. In the design, Velarde combines historical and modern forms in a highly individual and inventive manner. The building contains a rich variety of materials and fittings, including   extensive   areas   of   decorative   mosaic   tiling,   metalwork screens and original pews. Although vacant and vulnerable to damage at the time of writing, the building remains largely  unaltered as  an important example of a post-war Roman Catholic church.

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Birkenhead - Holy Name of Jesus

The finest example of a type of small-scale and intimate church which was developed by Edmund Kirby for particular situations where the budget and the site was limited (St Agnes, West Kirby of 1897 is another example). Whilst the building is small and externally self-effacing, the quality of detail in the moulded brickwork to the door and window openings, the string courses and hood moulds, and the timber work of the roofs to the nave and sanctuary is high.

Combined with the later fixtures and furnishings, in particular the Arts and Crafts stained glass by Margaret Rope, this gives the building a special significance.

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Birkenhead - Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

A church conceived on an ambitious scale, intended as the Cathedral church of the Diocese of Shrewsbury. Although simplified in execution, Our Lady’s remains an important early example of the work of E. W. Pugin. The church suffered from bomb damage in the war, but was sympathetically restored and largely retains its original character. It contains high quality fittings, including the pulpit by E. W. Pugin, and high altar and reredos by Pugin & Pugin with paintings by Hardman and Powell.

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Birkenhead - St Anne

A fine late church designed by E. W. Pugin, completed by the Pugin practice, and built for the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in 1875-77. The church lacks its intended tower and the external appearance is somewhat marred by later strengthening measures, but the  quality  of  the  external  and  internal  design,  and  especially  its complex spatial character give it special value. The sculpture and the internal furnishings are also of high quality. The church is complemented by the slightly later presbytery, which is probably also by the Pugin practice, and retains most of its original features.

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Birkenhead - St Joseph

St Joseph’s was designed by Edmund Kirby in 1899-1900 and is amongst the best examples of his large red brick urban churches. The building is of grand proportions, and displays Kirby’s skilful use of pressed and moulded bricks to achieve complexity and surface richness, both externally and internally. Internal fittings such as the reredos, organ and organ gallery are of high quality, and the unified character of the church has been well preserved in spite of later alterations.

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Birkenhead - St Michael and All Angels

One of the first Vatican II-inspired churches in the Diocese, designed to focus the attention of all who entered on the central altar. Its design was also a response to the need to provide a landmark at the end of a long axial avenue through the centre of the planned settlement of Woodchurch. The form of the building with its open plan, high tent-like roof clad in aluminium, and horizontal base of ribbed concrete was a bold and innovative statement that symbolised the progressive spirit enshrined in the new liturgy. The interior is generous and spacious, lit from above so that the light source is concealed, whilst the finishes – natural  timber,  quarry  tiles  and  white  painted  plaster  –  provide  a simple and dignified spirituality. The fittings and furnishings, also simple and bold in character, complement the building and remain largely as designed.

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Birkenhead - St Paul

A small post-war church which forms an integral element of the local Catholic primary school. Whilst the interior is welcoming and attractive, the building is of limited architectural or historic interest.

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Birkenhead - St Peter

A small post-war church by the prolific practice of Reynolds & Scott, of no special architectural or historic interest.

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Birkenhead - St Wedburgh

St Werburgh’s is the oldest church built for Catholic worship in Wirral. It is an important building within the town, but its setting has suffered from harmful highway and retail development in the post-war period. The church and presbytery are both in the Greek Revival style, possibly by M. E. Hadfield. The church lost its original interior due to a major re- ordering in 1970-72 following an outbreak of dry rot.

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Blessed John Henry Newman - Latchford

A new church, built after the merging of two parishes in Latchford, and possibly the first church in the country to be dedicated to Blessed John Henry Newman. It is a well-used and flexible modern design, containing some well-crafted furnishings. The future of its listed predecessor remains unresolved at the time of writing.

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Bollington - St Gregory

A good post-war village church, designed by  the prolific Manchester firm of Reynolds & Scott. The interior is little altered and retains a simple collection of harmonious fittings and finishes. The presbytery is part of the ensemble, on an elevated site in the Bollington conservation area.

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Bramhall - St Vincent de Paul

An example of the many modest dual-purpose parish hall/churches built on post-war housing estates. The exterior fenestration has been renewed, but the interior is almost unaltered, with good materials and a deft handling of natural light from high-level windows.

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