Wallasey - St Alban

A Puginian Gothic church of the 1850s by S.R. Eyre & J. A. Hansom, which is a significant landmark in a deprived town centre location. The church suffered from bomb damage and unsympathetic alterations in the past, but an ambitious programme of repairs and  re-ordering carried out in 2003 has restored its dignity and given the parish a renewed focus.

Read More

Wallasey - St Peter and St Paul

An architecturally ambitious and little-altered Catholic church of 1935, designed by E. Bower Norris. Monumental in scale and Baroque in its spatial conception, the building is modelled and ornamented with extreme simplicity. Attention internally is focussed on the high altar and side chapels, which are clad in sumptuous  marbles. Built on an elevated site, with its hemispherical dome, the church is a landmark seen from both land and sea, and is cited as a navigational reference point on the marine chart for the Liverpool Bay.

Read More

Wallasey- Sacred Heart

The Sacred Heart church was an ambitious project built for a growing township in the immediate post-war period. The design by Reynolds & Scott is typically robust in a stripped Gothic style rather than their usual Romanesque. The west tower is the dominant feature, in which decorative embellishment is concentrated, but the presbytery is given almost equal prominence to the church when seen from the roadside.

Read More

Weaverham - St Bede

A post-War church by the well-known architectural firm of Reynolds & Scott, adopting the Romanesque/Byzantine style popular for Catholic churches of the day. A simple and dignified design, which has been internally altered.

Read More

Wem - Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

A simple structure of the early 1990s.

Read More

West Kirby - St Agnes

Built in 1897, and the earliest of Edmund Kirby’s series of small-scale Catholic churches built to a limited budget, of which Holy Name, Oxton is the finest. The original building was simple in form and (unusually for Kirby) in detail; the sanctuary was added in 1905, and the present ensemble, pleasing but unremarkable, is the result of many  changes that have taken place over the twentieth century.

Read More

Whaley Bridge - Sacred Heart

A small stone-built church built at the end of the Victorian period, probably from designs by Edmund Kirby, to serve a growing town. It has some significance for its historic value, and is included within Whaley Bridge conservation area, although its set-back, screened position means that it is not prominent in the street scene.

Read More

Whitchurch - St George Protector of England

A simple Gothic school-chapel of 1878 by James O’Byrne. Hemmed in on both sides, the constraints of the elongated plot required the interior to be top-lit. There is good post-war stained glass in the sanctuary. The presbytery is one of a pair of late Georgian town houses.

Read More

Wilmslow - Sacred Heart and St Teresa

An early twentieth century Decorated Gothic design by a member of the Gillow family, architects and furniture designers of Lancaster. Superficially of conventional appearance, it has a relatively unaltered exterior and a complex interior of architectural interest.

Read More

Winsford - St Joseph

A large functional building of the 1970s, not of special architectural or historic interest.

Read More

Wythenshawe - Sacred Heart and St Peter

A functional building capable of providing a range of facilities, but lacking special architectural or historic interest.

Read More

Wythenshawe - St Aidan’s Centre

A striking, unusual design combining blunt Art Deco forms with Romanesque details.  The interior has high quality furnishings and good, simple architectural forms now compromised by subdivision.

Read More

Wythenshawe - St Anthony

An imposing and monumental building by an architect of note. The church has a rich, little-altered interior with strong architectural qualities and notable furnishings. The church is described as ‘one of the few real landmarks of Wythenshawe’ and ‘beautifully built’, by Hartwell, Hyde and Pevsner (2004). It is one of a group of mid- twentieth century churches in the suburb which demonstrated the commitment to mission in the new community and includes architecturally notable Anglican churches by Basil Spence and George Pace.

Read More

Wythenshawe - St Elizabeth

A flexible building with a dignified interior but without special architectural or historic interest.

Read More