Bridgnorth - St John the Evangelist

A mid-nineteenth century school-chapel and house, with a later nineteenth century church addition. Built with the support of the Acton family of Aldenham Park, this stone-built Gothic ensemble makes a positive contribution to the Bridgnorth Conservation Area.

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Brinnington - St Bernadette

A good example of a medium-size post-war estate church, one of the stronger designs by the prolific local architects Reynolds & Scott. The church interior is enhanced by a set of well-designed contemporary fittings and decorative materials, particularly the stained glass, by an unknown studio. The adaptation of the church to serve a dual purpose use has been achieved sympathetically.

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Bromborough - Christ the King

Designed by Reynolds & Scott, and completed in 1964, the church is a prominent landmark on the busy New Chester Road.  The verticality of its broad west tower contrasts with the horizontal lines of the nave and aisles. In form it is remarkably similar to the church of Our Lady of Lourdes, Leasowe by Arthur Farebrother, which was built at roughly the same time. The lofty interior is plain in character, but includes good bronze work by Gill & Sons of Dublin. The previous church by H. E. Flynn was adapted as the parish hall, but retains none of its original interior.

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Cheadle - St Chad

A good example of an urban 1930s church designed in a traditional Italian Romanesque style. The distinctive exterior is simple but well- detailed and the lofty interior retains its historic spatial character and some original furnishings, but not those of the sanctuary.

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Cheadle Hulme - St Ann

A modest post-war suburban church in the blocky sub-Romanesque style favoured by its architects, Reynolds & Scott. The arcaded interior is plainly finished and complemented by a set of contemporary liturgical fittings and seating.

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Chester - St Clare

A distinctive modern Gothic design by Reynolds & Scott, built in the post-war years to serve an expanding suburb of Chester. The little-altered interior is distinguished by a light, concrete vaulted nave. The church is of conventional longitudinal plan and retains some good internal fittings, including oak woodwork and marble altars and font.

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Chester - St Columba

A striking post-war church suburban church, built at the time of, and serving the new liturgical needs of, the Second Vatican Council. Fittings of note include a baptistery window by Unger & Schulze. Some of the external materials have not stood the test of time or have been replaced.

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Chester - St Francis

A town church by James O’Byrne, which with the adjoining friary building (also by O’Byrne) is an important element in the Chester Town Centre conservation area. The interior is a striking and in some respects unusual design, retaining some good fittings. O’Byrne is a northern Catholic architect of note and this is a good example of one of his middling-sized church designs.

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Chester - St Theresa

A bold landmark post-war suburban church. The spacious, well-lit interior is conventionally arranged but retains some attractive fittings, including a striking mosaic reredos, oak pews and a marble altar and pulpit.

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Chester - St Werburgh

A large stone-built church in French lancet Gothic style, and an early work by Edward Kirby. An intended tower and spire were never built, but the church nevertheless makes a prominent and worthy contribution to the city centre conservation area. The picturesque contemporary presbytery is also by Kirby. The high, uninterrupted interior volume of the church is most impressive and despite a major reordering in the early twenty-first century, a number of internal features of note remain.

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Church Stretton - St Milburga

A modest inter-war chapel with a white pebbledashed exterior and an attractive homely interior with segmental ceiling. A presbytery was built at the same time; both buildings have been significantly altered over the years

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Cleobury Mortimer - St Elizabeth

A simple building of the early 1960s, with historical connections with the Blount family of Mawley Hall and good stained glass, probably by Earley of Dublin.

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Congleton - St Mary

The oldest Catholic church in use in Cheshire, designed along with its contemporary attached presbytery by Dr Hall, the mission priest. The church follows the common pre-Emancipation pattern in its plain, Nonconformist character. It retains its original marble sarcophagus high altar.

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Crewe - St Mary of the Immaculate Conception

A stately design by Pugin & Pugin. The bold red brick exterior and tall tower are local landmarks, and the church forms a good group with the adjoining  presbytery.  The  interior  is  tall  and  wide,  with  an unobstructed view of the Caen stone high altar and reredos.

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Dukinfield - St Mary

A good example of a small urban Catholic church built to serve a working community in an industrial town. It is fairly typical of the more modest churches built by the Hadfield practice in the mid-nineteenth century, with less lavish decorative details than some others such as St Joseph’s, Stockport. The church has been well-cared for and retains some attractive, mostly early to mid-twentieth century fittings.

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Ellesmere Port (Great Sutton) - St Saviour

A functional modern building of no particular architectural or historical note, incorporating some sculpture of interest.

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Ellesmere Port (Hooton) - St Mary of the Angels

A distinctive church by a pupil of E. W. Pugin, designed with great care and attention to detail. The interior displays imaginative and unusual touches, such as the sparing use of contrasting stone, a vaulted canted apse and good stained glass. The slightly later Stanley chapel may be by Edmund Kirby; it is in matching style and adds to the special interest of the building.

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Ellesmere Port - Our Lady Star of the Sea

An interesting architectural essay by Edmund Kirby & Sons. It adopts simple bold forms of the ‘primitive’ Romanesque and Byzantine type popular in the interwar years. While not innovatory either liturgically or in terms of construction or style, the church is a striking design by a well-known firm of architects, with retention of some important original furnishings and an almost completely unaltered exterior.

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Ellesmere Port - St Bernard

A functional modern dual-purpose church and hall. The dedication to St Bernard relates to the nearby medieval Cistercian house at Stanlow, stones from which are placed below the altar.

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Frodsham - St Luke

An imaginative design of 1980, displaying good massing and planning. The exterior, with a loggia below and tower motif above, is highly distinctive. The interior of the church exhibits clever manipulation of light and space.

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