Sale Moor - Holy Family

A church of the 1970s, not of special architectural or historic interest, although well-designed for its purpose.

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Sandbach - St Winefride

A small but characterful building by a local architect, with some good detailing.The building is primarily of townscape interest; the interior is plain and contains no furnishings of particular note.

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Shifnal - St Mary

The church was built with the adjoining house as a combined school and chapel, from designs by C. A. Buckler, a notable architect of the Gothic Revival. The interior of the church has been altered, but its external design and group value with the adjoining house make a positive contribution to the Shifnal Conservation Area.

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Shrewsbury - Cathedral Church of Our Lady Help of Christians and St Peter of Alcantara

The Cathedral church of the Diocese, built from designs by E.W. Pugin, under the patronage of the Seventeenth Earl of Shrewsbury. This was Pugin’s first major commission, taken over from his late father A. W. N. Pugin at the age of just nineteen. The external appearance is relatively modest, its plan confined by site constraints; an intended tower and spire were never built. The Cathedral has been augmented and enriched over the years, with additions by Edmund Kirby and fittings by E. W. Pugin, Hardman, Margaret Rope and others. The building has landmark quality within its immediate setting and when viewed from the River  Severn, and with other Cathedral buildings forms a good group in the Town Centre Conservation Area.

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Shrewsbury - Our Lady of Pity

A late church by F.X. Velarde, completed after his death, with many characteristics and details typical of this interesting and significant post-war architect. The design is similar to Velarde’s earlier church at Monkmoor, but displays more personal and idiosyncratic touches. The exterior is plain, save for the polygonal campanile with diamond-shaped belfry openings and the bluff apsidal east end. The interior is marked by a succession of low-brick arches, culminating in a sanctuary with carved Pietà by Velarde’s frequent collaborator, Herbert Tyson Smith.

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Shrewsbury - St Winefride

A fairly late church by F. X. Velarde, with many design characteristics and details typical of that interesting and significant post-war architect. The exterior is plain, save for the square campanile with arched belfry openings and the bluff apsidal east end. The interior is marked by a succession of low-brick arches, and an intact original paint scheme on the ceilings. Velarde-designed fittings include the altar and crucifix.

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Stalybridge - St Peter

A stone-built design of 1838-39, in many ways typical of Catholic church architecture of the period, in a thin pre-Puginian Early English Gothic. It was designed by the noted architect Matthew Hadfield, who went on to undertake many important commissions for the Catholic Church. Although the building has been altered it retains a good altar and reredos designed by the well-known architect Edmund Kirby.

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Stalybridge - St Raphael

A notable example of experimental 1960s church design, retaining its original character to a high degree. The stained glass screen by Pierre Fourmaintraux, original corona and ceramic Stations and holy water stoups by Alan Boyson are all striking features of the interior.

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Stockport - Our Lady and the Apostles

A striking Edwardian town church by the Liverpool architect Edmund Kirby. The bold red brick and terracotta exterior is a strong feature on the edge of Stockport town centre, with a contemporary presbytery. The lofty interior is for its date a fairly conservative but nevertheless successful Gothic design with good, well-made fittings, including glass attributed to Margaret Rope.

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Stockport - St Ambrose

A plain, robust example of a medium-sized church built to serve an inter-war suburban estate. Its blocky Romanesque design is similar to other churches designed by Hill Sandy & Norris in this style. The aisled interior retains some original fittings such as pews and an attractive set of late 1930s Stations of the Cross.

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Stockport - St Joseph

A little-altered mid-nineteenth century urban church by M. E. Hadfield, striking  and  plain, with a  lofty interior  designed  to  provide unobstructed views of the sanctuary, in reaction to Puginian principles. There are contemporary adjoining schools which with the church make a positive contribution to the Stockport conservation area.

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Tarporley - St Thomas Becket

A simple, practical church converted in 1941 from a cafe and largely rebuilt in 1971.

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Tattenhall - St Plegmund

A functional structure of the 1970s, intended to serve as the parish hall to a church which has not been built.

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Telford - St Mary

Madeley is sometimes referred to as ‘the Mother mission of Shropshire’. A long-standing  centre of Catholic activity in the penal years, a ‘Massing House’ was built here in 1769, with a chapel behind. This building  survives  today  as  the presbytery. In the mid-nineteenth century the old chapel was superseded (but not demolished) by a large new church designed by J. A. Hansom, of which only the nave and aisles were built.  Although much altered, the Massing  House and attached former chapel is an important early survival in the Diocese, predating the Catholic Relief Acts. The house and Hansom’s church are set within a church yard and make a prominent and positive contribution to the Madeley Conservation Area, which lies within the Ironbridge World Heritage Site.

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Telford - St Patrick

This large town church is a relatively late manifestation of the Gothic Revival. Designed by a little-known architect and twice reordered, its main interest lies in the external design and massing (including a tower with octagonal upper stage, reminiscent of the Boston stump) and its generous internal volumes.

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Telford - St Paul

A multi-purpose structure of the 1980s, of no particular architectural or historic interest.

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Upton - St Joseph

A carefully planned and well constructed building in an attractive village setting. The church was designed by Adrian Gilbert Scott and built in 1953-54 in  a late Gothic Revival style, with touches of modernism in its interior form. It has been sympathetically re-ordered and retains its original character. The quality of materials and workmanship is high.

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Wallasey - English Martyrs

The first of F. X. Velarde’s major post-war churches, and one of  the largest and most richly decorated. It contains a group of significant art works. Designed before the war, it forms a transition between the more expressionist  churches  such  as  St  Monica,  Bootle,  and  his  later  and more personal work. The building remains largely unaltered.

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Wallasey - Our Lady Star of the Sea and St Joseph

A lofty and imposing urban church designed by Edmund Kirby with a bold outline and a powerful west front. The form of the church owes much to the nearby Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception by E. W. Pugin, to whom Kirby was apprenticed. The interior too is noble and well-proportioned, and includes a high altar and reredos panelled in fine coloured marbles, as well as high quality early twentieth century stained glass. The church has been sensitively reordered.

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Wallasey - Our Lady of Lourdes

A large and prominent church close to the seashore at Leasowe. It was expertly built on sand in the early 1960s, in a stripped classical style with a plain but well-proportioned interior. A re-ordering scheme of the late 1980s reduced the size of the worship space. In the last few years, an exemplary scheme of repairs and conversion has given the building a new and sustainable future.

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